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Laughing quite hard here, loving the black latex gloves, the supposed readiation from the box before he removes the watch, and then he leaves it in the plastic bag, like thats going to help, i mean how many people wore watches like that all the time? Guess they havent got hair loss or non functioning reproductive organs.
personally im not taking this seriously at all im afraid, in my job im wearing stuff that has rad signs on them and im not too bothered about that. I reckon its a ploy by the film maker to scare people into not buying vintage watches thus leaving the market open to him to encrease his collection at a lower cost. Just my to pennies worth.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
That is my watch...I am a collector of cool watches.

The reason for the gloves is to keep things from slipping...watches are easier to handle this way.

The bag is for inventory purposes....noticed it's marked.

And yes the metal container was to prove a point....you can get exposure through metal.

This is real.
 

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I had a 1947 Tissot with radium lume and I decided to get it tested along with a WW British Army marching compass I had. I emailed a unit of our health department that looks after radioactive materials and they offered to take a look one lunchtime. Now I can't remember off the top of my head the readings they got but they advised occasional use would be ok, but not everyday. They said I shouldn't open either, because ingesting radium dust was a greater risk than the radiation being emitted. Long story short, I have two young children and decided I didn't need either device in the house - particularly the compass with its much high rad levels. Funny thing is that I played with that compass as a child but wouldn't contemplate allowing my own children to do the same. Both went to people appropriately aware of the risks.

There is a long thread on this issue over on WUS. Some people have found alarming levels on their pre-1960s watches.


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Enjoyed the video. Nice watches OP.

I don't have a daily wearer, so it wouldn't bother me to have in the collection, and on the wrist in rotation. Pretty neat historically, IMO - it might even be a selling point.
 

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That model was manufactured From the 20's through the 60's so the pre-50's dials were painted with radium. Wouldn't want to inhale any of that doing a re-lume with its 1600 year half life!
 

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I used to work a couple offices over from some USAF nuclear engineers. I mentioned I had a radium dialed Omega Seamaster, and they offered to test how hot it was. They tested it, and basically asked how attached I was to the watch. If it wasn't sentimental they said, why own something known to be harmful. I decided it wasn't worth the risk. I get why others will decide elsewise, but in the end I sure didn't want to wonder 20 years from now if my choice in watch was why I was in a hospital. I sold it.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I went though my entire collection and found quite a few items that were hot. By the end I could tell just by looking that something was hot...radium dials have a very distinct look to them and they tend to burn the dial.

The worst offender was a no name watch which read over 160uSv/hr. Instant exposure to this radiation slightly worse than getting a chest x-ray. 1hr exposure is as bad as being 3km away from Fukushima 83 days after the nuclear disaster.

The second worst was this Seapearl 600. Huge bummer because this watch has an amazing history...the watches it was compared to were the Blancpain Milspec 1 and the Big Crown Rolex Submariner (no crown guard)...both worth over
$20k. Not to mention that there arn't many examples that I have seen pictures of that are as nice as mine.

The bad part is most that most people wouldn't invest in a decent tool to determine the approximate radiation levels. I felt that there was a safety issue so I bit the bullet and got something good and glad that I did. I want to enjoy collecting but I want to stay safe doing it.
 

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Interesting. Thanks for sharing. Better think twice before you relume an old watch. Any idea what has been used in Seiko watches like the 62MAS, 6105 etc?
 
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