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Discussion Starter #1
I've had this paper weight since late '06 and it unfortunately suffered a 4' fall onto a hardwood floor about a year ago and landed on the front. The minute hand dislodged and spun freely, so it quietly sat in the box since I didn't have the nerve to fix until I cleaned my 7002 this past weekend. Long story short, I gathered the troops and opened her up to reseat the minute hand back down onto the post properly (it sort of snapped back into place). It's in recharge mode now...


The strap is Deluarian's original Ecozilla strap serial #9/? signed in 06 (I don't know how many he made), and I bought it as u see here from the old Dive Watch forum. Nice to have it resurrected again and will give her a full sunbath tomorrow to really recharge it properly. It is doing the 2-second skipping dance right now, but has kept the time properly for the past two hours under the lights. It was a decidedly simple affair--a lot of case for such a modest sized movement.


Yeah, big sigh of relief...I decided to snap a few photos tonight, and will begin to rebrush the case and thoroughly clean her up tomorrow. As you can see the case has quite a few nicks and scratches.


Best,


Mike







 

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Re: EcoZilla lives!

may I ask how you opened the watch to reach the hand?
Is it sealed completely now?

BTW, excellent work in bringing the Zilla back to life!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Re: EcoZilla lives!

Hi -


The process was nearly the same as working on the 7002, and I followed the basic steps outlined in the various tutorials in the Tech section here, (which were mega helpful on crown removal). This watch is just a desk diver since the previous owner had opened the case before I bought it, otherwise I'd have had Citizen do it and re-pressure test it.


1) Remove the strap retaining ring and strap.
2) Remove case back.
3) Remove crown, unlock and pull to FIRST stop, then press release button (marked with "<- Push" on the movement itself) while gently pulling the crown out. This took a few tries and found by reading some older crown removal posts in the archives that from the "first" stop is when to remove it. I could actually see the lock trip under the Optivisor.
4) Remove main rubber gasket that seats the movement.
5) Remove movement per normal and then I could access the hands as normal.


HTH,


Mike
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Re: EcoZilla lives!

Well I decided to strip it back down again and do as much work to the case as possible to further improve its looks. It has some tiny nicks that camera really make look scary but on the wrist they are barely noticeable now. Good Ecozilla case shots are hard to find on the web, so maybe these will be of use to others here.


Best,


Mike


With the strap holder ring removed



Strap ring and bolts cleaned up
[img]


Case ready to be opened
[img]http://www.fototime.com/314B266ABD79D3A/orig.jpg





From the front with the bezel holding ring removed (mine was on pretty tight and took quite a bit of time and effort to remove without damage.

[img]


With bezel removed. It comes off with a sharp knife like any other. Springs are built into the case so nothing to lose. Yeah...
[img]http://www.fototime.com/EDF8E6258AB2972/orig.jpg


Case back removed and crown pulled out. Note the push button circled for crown removal



Movement removed and resting in rubber gasket



The empty case and I have repolished the crystal as well



[img]


Group shot
[img]


Obligatory lume shot
[img]


Everything put back in its place and back into the rotation. Lot of fun really and glad I didn't screw the pooch with this one. I was worried earlier.
[img]


[img]


[img]


[img][/i]
 

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Thanks for all the great pics, and good to hear you were able to get the minute hand back on again. That Delaurian strap RULES!


Ted
 

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8) Great work there my friend.Nice to see an Ecozilla on something other than Rubber.Great Strap and good work.
 

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Thank you, thank you, thank you, thaaaaank you, for taking the time and effort to do this!

All the Ecozilla lovers - yours truly included - are very grateful to you.

I have one big question to you, only (well, 2 actually): since you cracked the case open, did you find necessary to re´place the gaskets in order to make sure the watch will remain water tight?

As for question number 2, can you tell me what type of seal does the crystal utilize? Is it nylon or regular rubber, a la Seiko's?

As for question number 3 (and you thought I was finished with 2, eh?! ;D ), it's something I have been asking here quite a lot, but to this day no one could answer this.....the ecozilla is a 300m rated watch, for use in mixed gas divings. Then, you have the autozilla, rated to 1000m, with virtually the very same case, but this time with a built in He valve. Since both watches are meant to be worn on mixed gas diving, why on Earth did Citizen feel the need to build one with an escape valve and the other without one?

Thanks again for the detailed post. And also, thanks for any inputs on the questions above. :)

Regards,
CHRIS
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks guys, glad this was helpful. Trying to put the site info to good use. ;)


Chris said:
I have one big question to you, only (well, 2 actually): since you cracked the case open, did you find necessary to re´place the gaskets in order to make sure the watch will remain water tight?

As for question number 2, can you tell me what type of seal does the crystal utilize? Is it nylon or regular rubber, a la Seiko's?

As for question number 3 (and you thought I was finished with 2, eh?! ;D ), it's something I have been asking here quite a lot, but to this day no one could answer this.....the ecozilla is a 300m rated watch, for use in mixed gas divings. Then, you have the autozilla, rated to 1000m, with virtually the very same case, but this time with a built in He valve. Since both watches are meant to be worn on mixed gas diving, why on Earth did Citizen feel the need to build one with an escape valve and the other without one?
Thanks Chris, and some answers in order. Only caveat is I'm just a fan and by no means an expert. So don't take these as any sort of gospel... O0

1) I did not replace any gaskets or seals. The interior of this watch looked immaculate as you can see, including the gaskets, and since this one has never been below the 6" water line it has never been pushed or worked hard. But as I mentioned to Time earlier, I bought it used with D strap and was already opened once by the previous owner when the strap went on and he recommended a Citizen pressure test if I ever intended to use it as designed. Costs have kept me from ever doing that, so I can't give a full answer. I would be surprised though if this one leaked while swimming for example, everything is cinched back down pretty tight.

2) I can't actually, I didn't remove the crystal (press is coming in the mail though for future projects). My crystal was near perfect and once polished out looks new. Trust me it is there in the photos. It was very hard to see the gasket up under the inner bezel ring thru the case back so I really have no idea as to material. Sorry...but another comment on this watch design is how well protected the crystal actually is. It sits almost 1/8" below the top of the bezel and I'd guess Citizen clearly intended this level of protection for it given the shear height of this case design. Yes the bezel takes more abuse because of it, but the crystal doesn't. An interesting design compromise of style and protection and only a direct hit to the center of the watch will contact the crystal. So that means the door frame gets chunked by the watch case and not my crystal getting scratched instead. ::)

3) This is also conjecture based on my part, but hopefully with a bit of intelligent guestimating I can give a sensible response. No one but Citizen could honestly give us a full answer, but here goes anyway. My first thought is cost and market share. A non-HE valve 300M diver is by nature cheaper than a 1000M HE valve equipped cousin. While the cases certainly look similar, I'd venture that measured out they are different and the specific changes needed to make a 1000M diver do indeed increase its costs. By intent not having a release valve will limit its depth rating, (a non-HE valve diver does not need the added security of either the release valve or a proper gasket to seal the crystal from popping out due to gas expansion), and thus keeps it at a reasonable price point for those in the market for a very bold and unique 300M diver.

By the same thought, Citizen clearly thought giving the market 3 choices in SS 300M, Ti 300M, and Ti 1000M covered the upper/middle end of analog diver market spectrum for their product needs. The material changes are pretty pragmatic and easy to understand between SS & Ti. And the (HE valve -- non-HE valve) idea seems to fit this idea as well. My guess is the buyer of a working 1000M diver is not the same as the guy who likes the big dog look, but just scuba dive's only, so the 300M gives him the right choice. 300M mix-gas diving is right at the limit of what the crystal and case design can handle without damage, so it makes sense to produce this cheaper lower limit mix-gas version, plus it does make it stand out as being more unique in the 300M market (as if the case design didn't do that already). If I was a betting man, I'd say Citizen designed the 1000M first, then back-engineered it to give us a less-exspensive cousin to enjoy as well. But I lose my shorts in Vegas every time...


What's more fascinating to me is the cost of changing the case strap location between the rubber strap models and the bracelet equipped versions. That seems odd, but maybe it was cheaper to change the case than create a bracelet connector that fit the rubber strap area. At full retail having a bracelet and a rubber strap would have been ideal I'd thought.

Best,


Mike
 

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This is great info. Thanks so much for posting the dissassembly pictures.
My question is (and this seems to be the million dollar question for 300m EcoZillas) how do you get the bezel off after the retaining ring is unscrewed?
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Aurelius said:
This is great info. Thanks so much for posting the dissassembly pictures.
My question is (and this seems to be the million dollar question for 300m EcoZillas) how do you get the bezel off after the retaining ring is unscrewed?

Thanks, I didn't experience any real difficulties removing the bezel. In fact I snapped these real quick for you to illustrate the process a bit better.


With the retainer ring removed and access granted. Note I am pointing to this side of the case since the spring is not present in this location letting the knife insert properly:



Insert knife blade and twist.[/i]
[img]




HTH,


Mike
 

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Speedbird, thank you SO MUCH for all the detailed explanations. You did an unreal job, here.

Mods, I'd suggest this thread should be saved on the tech archives. It is THAT good and useful as future reference.

I've always wanted to see more in depth info and detail on this watch and case construction. My genuine guess is this was always meant to be Citizen's answer to Seiko's tuna series, given the similarities in the case construction. Heck, the Zilla and the 600m and 1000m tunas are exactly the same diameter....
 

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It amazes me a lot how come the Ecozilla is not discussed here more frequently. It's A LOT OF watch and can stand its own amongst any top dollar diver in terms of case construction, IMO. It's definitely one of my all time favorite. Sometimes I call it Citizen tuna!
 

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Chris said:
It amazes me a lot how come the Ecozilla is not discussed here more frequently. It's A LOT OF watch and can stand its own amongst any top dollar diver in terms of case construction, IMO. It's definitely one of my all time favorite. Sometimes I call it Citizen tuna!

I Agree.
It's one heck of a diver!! 8)
 

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speedbird119 said:
Thanks, I didn't experience any real difficulties removing the bezel. In fact I snapped these real quick for you to illustrate the process a bit better.


With the retainer ring removed and access granted. Note I am pointing to this side of the case since the spring is not present in this location letting the knife insert properly:



Insert knife blade and twist.[/i]
[img]




HTH,


Mike

Thanks so much for this. I posted that questiion a while ago on several forums and couldn't get an answer. I believe I was told it couldn't be done. While that might be true for the model with the fixed retaining ring, I specifically asked about the one with screw down ring. Anyway thanks again Mike. Pure gold info.









[/quote]
 

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Chris said:
It amazes me a lot how come the Ecozilla is not discussed here more frequently. It's A LOT OF watch and can stand its own amongst any top dollar diver in terms of case construction, IMO. It's definitely one of my all time favorite. Sometimes I call it Citizen tuna!
Chris said:
It amazes me a lot how come the Ecozilla is not discussed here more frequently. It's A LOT OF watch and can stand its own amongst any top dollar diver in terms of case construction, IMO. It's definitely one of my all time favorite. Sometimes I call it Citizen tuna!
I agree too. I think it's bang for the buck value can't be beat. And the fact that it's a great concealed weapon dosn't hurt either.
 
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