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The 7000 is just the model code. Today's piece of 'useless information' is that had it been '5000' it would have been a non roundwatch as all Seiko model numbers beginning with 5 appear to have a square (or hexagonal) face/dial.......
 

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I have a Seiko 5 5126-7000. What does the 7000 stand for?
The 1st set of 4 numbers are the caliber number, this should match the dial as well. The watch should have a 5126 movement inside. The 2nd set of 4 numbers is the case type number, these don't always match the dial exact but usually match the 1st number (this instance being a 7). The dial should have the 5126 at the bottom followed by a dial lot number.

The serial number shows the year, month and production number. The 1st number is the year, the 2nd number is the month, the remaining numbers are the number in the production run. Knowing the decade the movement was produced helps determine the year it was made with just that 1st number to go by. There are some that were produced more than a decade and need a little more research to figure out though.
 

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The 1st set of 4 numbers are the caliber number, this should match the dial as well. The watch should have a 5126 movement inside. The 2nd set of 4 numbers is the case type number, these don't always match the dial exact but usually match the 1st number (this instance being a 7). The dial should have the 5126 at the bottom followed by a dial lot number.



The serial number shows the year, month and production number. The 1st number is the year, the 2nd number is the month, the remaining numbers are the number in the production run. Knowing the decade the movement was produced helps determine the year it was made with just that 1st number to go by. There are some that were produced more than a decade and need a little more research to figure out though.
What he said

Sendt fra min SM-G955F med Tapatalk
 

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For some watches, but I think not all, I have read that the “7” or the “8” at the beginning of the case code apparently refers to some aspect of the dial size, with “8” being larger than “7”. You find “9” as well, but I don’t know if that also applies for “9” in the same way as it does for 7 and 8. I don't think it (always) applies if it's a "9". "9" is sometimes, but not always, used for higher-end watches. It doesn’t apply if it’s “5” - I’m not sure/don’t think it applies if it’s less than 7, at least not to all watches. I'm not sure if it applies if it's a "6". You do find examples with 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 at the beginning as well.

The 7000 is just the model code. Today's piece of 'useless information' is that had it been '5000' it would have been a non roundwatch as all Seiko model numbers beginning with 5 appear to have a square (or hexagonal) face/dial.......
Usually, but not always. The 7A48-5000 is as round as most other 7A movement watches, which do tend to have hooded lugs. The H558-5000/9 “Arnie” is pretty round, too, though I guess its dial does have a flat bit to it. Round mechanical stop-watches tend to have a case code in the 5xxx range. Let’s just call these the exceptions that prove the rule. :)
 

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Not sure if this is correct but does it also specify screw or snap on case back. This I suppose could come under SF's sug, case code.
 

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The case opening type is usually a sub letter or letter number combo, in a box after the xxxx-xxxx Here's a reference post https://www.plus9time.com/seiko-case-back-information It's also interesting to note, that in the GMT link, it gives an example of one of Seiko's case manufacturers - Tenryu. Tenryu is now part of Epson/Seiko and opened a manufacturing plant in Singapore During 1968. Was this the start of Seiko's 'Singapore' marked watch production/assembly?? https://global.epson.com/company/corporate_history/timeline/
 

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Not sure if this is correct but does it also specify screw or snap on case back. This I suppose could come under SF's sug, case code.


I don’t think there’s any correlation between what number the case code is and what type of case-back it has across different models.
 
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