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Discussion Starter #1
Hello all,
I am new to the forum. I am overhauling a Citizen Automatic. On the case back is inscribed as follows - 4-R14627 R, 8D 5022, GN-4W-S. I have no idea what model this is. Anyway, the glass crystal housing appears to have a groove for an o-ring seal. My claiper won't get in tight enough for an exact measurement. I need a replacement and wondering if anyone knows of a source or can tell me the exact size so I can make one. Looking for OD/ID and thickness. Any help would be much appreciated.

Time Keeper
 

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Glass gasket: 393-7421
Bezel gasket: 393-4092
Back gasket: 393-0018

It is doubtful that some one will have the info you seek, especially if that is not a popular case reference (4-R14627). Perhaps try ordering the genuine gaskets, based on the part numbers above (info from boley.de). If it is a more recent model (last couple decades) and a more straight-forward design, I'd guess a plastic gasket would have been originally installed to keep the crystal in place, not a rubber one.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Crystal Housing Seal Citizen

Noah, thank you so much for taking your time to reply to my post. I am uploading pictures of the watch and case. I think this case is common as I have seen many similar examples on the internet. If you or anyone else on the forum would be so kind to verify if at all possible what seal or gasket I need, where I might get one, and a proceedure for installing, I would be greatful. I the part numbers you mention in your reply may infact be what I need, I am trying to be sure before ordering. Thanks again for all of your time and trouble.

Matt B.
 

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Hi Matt,
The gasket that would hold the two items together that you show is called a bezel gasket (where as the crystal gasket holds the crystal in the bezel). Though I'd play it safe and assume that if the bezel gasket needs replacing, so does the crystal gasket- so best to source both. If you are unfamiliar with sourcing watch parts and do not have the connections to do so, perhaps seek out a local watchmaker to do the work for you. You also need the correct type of crystal press and dies to install bezels like this (uneven pressure will ruin the gasket and prevent a proper seal), which the watchmaker should already have and be well-versed in its use.
I would add a caution, however, that because the dial appears to be unoriginal or repainted, there could be other things "up" with the watch's originality. One of which could be swapped casing parts, which may render the listings I gave incompatible with your specific situation (if for example your case back has been swapped, or the bezel is not original to the rest of the case or has been altered).

Best,
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks Noah, I do have a crystal press but not a very good one, I think your right about the dial repaint, but this is just something I am playing with. I figure if I wreck it, I'm not out much and if I can get it running again, it can be a beater watch. Movement is a citizen. If I was going to buy another crystal press what would you recommend? Also would you assume the bezel gasket number you initially cited is the part I need? I have access to parts. Thank you. I have another question I will send later.
 

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If I was going to buy another crystal press what would you recommend? Also would you assume the bezel gasket number you initially cited is the part I need? I have access to parts. Thank you. I have another question I will send later.
Those part numbers are what I would start with, but there's always a chance they are not correct. Better than a complete guess or random number generator though, right? :)

Buy the most expensive new crystal press you can afford, or alternatively look for an old "BB" crystal press with a full set of dies. New nylon dies are also available for them, which are really nice for not worrying about damaging finished casing parts that come into contact with the dies. The BB presses have a decent weight to them, and support the dies pretty well. There are knock-offs that aren't quite as heavy-duty, and not always perfectly true/centered between upper and lower die- not desirable traits.
 
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