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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Unfortunately, my house is very humid. I live close to a stream and we're rarely at home during business hours, so the house is invariably closed all day long. And with that, humidity is always something of a concern :eek: . And to my despair I was able to confirm it is a problem: I set my watch box in the son for about 15 minutes and then, back inside, dropped a drop of icey water on the crystal. All my divers were fine, as expected, and even my Le Locle and Mido Alldial, but my vintage Omega Genève and my Orient RM1 developed fogging under the crystal
. And to my total surprise, so did my Casio Mudman :-[ .

Do I have to send them in or could I try to dry them up myself? I was thinking of closing them in an air-tight jar with some silica pillows or maybe those pots with lye (we use them to put inside closets and wardrobes to suck water out of the air). If I keep the watches in the jar for a few days, would it be enough to remove the humidity inside? And what about heating the whole watch box in the sun, in the open air, every once in a while, would that be enough to avoid build up of condensation inside the not-so-water-resistant watches?
 

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Do you have central A/C in your house? Here in Miami heat and humidity are a huge problem, so the A/C needs to be run periodically during the day to avoid problems like these. Also clothes get ruined in high humidity conditions.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
No AC here :( .
I would really like to move from here (to a bigger house), but right now the stars are not properly aligned for that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Nah, that won't fly. Too expensive and the house isn't ours, so whatever I do I have to revert after I'm gone. The only option would be to keep all my watches in an air-tight box. That's doable, very cheap and easy to do, but I would have to retire my glass top watch box, so I would like to keep that option as a last resort.
 

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Hi Luciano, thats a bummer. :(


You could try opening case back and placing in a container with silica packs or even rice would work to absorb the moisture.
Also, somebody told me to leave caseback off place on windowsill for sunlight or under lamp and place a clean sheet of paper over it to kept debris out. Should dry it out.


As humidity goes, I remember when I lived in Hong Kong. Its like 95% humidity in the monsoon months. Brutal. We keep our cameras and stuff in sealed tight containers with silica packs. Change packs every few months or so, don't remember for how long. Thats all you can do I'm afraid until you get some AC going.


Good luck.
Dave.
 

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You don't want to open those watches in that humid of an environment as it seems the ambient air probably more humid than what's inside the watches. Even drying them out, you'll just catch it all back in when you close them up.

If you can't find a place that has some control over the humidity, perhaps you can wait for a dryer season?
 

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nhoJ said:
Even drying them out, you'll just catch it all back in when you close them up.
This bit of your post sums it all for me. It looks like the problem itself lies in the sealing system of the troubled watches. A fact that helps to prove this theory is that other watchers - the diver's ones - are intact, due to their sealing systems being impenetrable right now (the gaskets are probably in tip top shape).

I would suggest Luciano to look into replacing the gaskets in the 2 fogged up watches. A properly sealed watch with the gaskets in shape should not allow humidity or fumes to get inside the case, unless the watch was assembled in a humid enviroment in the first place. In that case, the seals of the watches are OK, and then drying them up might solve the problem.

If they were my watches, my priority would be going to a servicing facility and have the gaskets condition checked; provided they are OK, the next step is asking for a pressure check / dry test to be performed, in order to verify if they are sealed indeed.
Assuming these 2 procedures turn out OK, then, by exclusion, the problem originated in the assembling of the watches in a humid place, to begin with.

Since one of the watches is the Orient RM1, Luw, I know for a fact that this watch was assembled in a very humid enviroment, since it comes from Manaus, at the Amazon forest - same place where the RM2 and Poseidon are assembled. :eek:

Just my own opinion, and I could be very wrong, of course.

Regards,
CHRIS
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
If I'm not mistaken, at least for the RM2, so I suspect that with the RM1 it was the same, the watches were assembled here in SP, so I'm fairly positive whatever got in there was after assembly. Besides, I'm not the first owner, so I can't vouch about how well the original owner took care of the watch ::) .

What I want to do is dry them up, and then keep then in an humidity-free environment - a hermetic plastic box or case. I thought a lot about this and I don't see a way out, unless I want to spend on AC. I know that the best way to do this would be of course by opening them up and then putting them in a hermetic jar or box with some sort of dehumidifier, but I really want to avoid opening the watches. I do not have the tools and do not want to risk scratching something, so I was hoping to do it as they are. Do you think putting them in a sealed box/jar/case along with a strong dehumidifier for a few days would work?
 

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Luciano,

When I lived in Singapore(humidty central ;D ), my father kept his Nikon camera and lenses in a vacuum jar. It was about 10" in diameter and 14" tall with a domed top. There was a small pump at the base which you pulled and pushed until the little analog gauge read zero Bar/zero psi. He also had a buch of silica-gal packets sitting in the bottom.

This little system worked well.

An added bennefit is that the humid air will be drawn out of the watch if it is leaking :)
 

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Pin said:
Luciano,

When I lived in Singapore(humidty central ;D ), my father kept his Nikon camera and lenses in a vacuum jar. It was about 10" in diameter and 14" tall with a domed top. There was a small pump at the base which you pulled and pushed until the little analog gauge read zero Bar/zero psi. He also had a buch of silica-gal packets sitting in the bottom.

This little system worked well.

An added bennefit is that the humid air will be drawn out of the watch if it is leaking :)
This is the ticket for living in humid conditions. I remember from my HK days. Same humid conditions, and loads of silica packs.


good luck. Dave
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I'm pretty sure a vacuum chamber would work, but unfortunately I don't have anything close to that.
I guess it will have to be a big Tupperware pot with silica packs or something equivalent. The good thing about those calcium chloride pots (it's not lye, as I thought) that we use in closets and cabinets is that they are disposable. When they fill up with water you put a fresh one in, and that beats the need of baking silica packs every once in a while.
 

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LUW said:
If I'm not mistaken, at least for the RM2, so I suspect that with the RM1 it was the same, [glow=red,2,300]the watches were assembled here in SP[/glow], so I'm fairly positive whatever got in there was after assembly. Besides, I'm not the first owner, so I can't vouch about how well the original owner took care of the watch ::) .

What I want to do is dry them up, and then keep then in an humidity-free environment - a hermetic plastic box or case. I thought a lot about this and I don't see a way out, unless I want to spend on AC. I know that the best way to do this would be of course by opening them up and then putting them in a hermetic jar or box with some sort of dehumidifier, but I really want to avoid opening the watches. I do not have the tools and do not want to risk scratching something, so I was hoping to do it as they are. Do you think putting them in a sealed box/jar/case along with a strong dehumidifier for a few days would work?
Luw,

There's no such thing as assembling of watches in SP. Each and every watch assembled in Brazil is made in Manaus (Zona Franca). That's the case with any Orient (and also SEIKOs and CITIZENs commercialized and assembled in Brazil). I know that for a fact, since I'm friends with Mr. Massao Kondo, owner of the Gold Five store, whom was in charge of organizing and distributing the RM2 pieces for the participants. He's also the major distributor for the Orient watches in Sao Paulo.

In the RM1 case, I would send it in for servicing at the Orient facilities in SP (fica no centro da cidade, na Rua Direita....entra no site da Orient....)
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I didn't know that. I was under the impression (read it somewhere? FRM?) that these SE were assembled in SP.

How is the service at Orient? Expensive? I would normally send it to Carregalo, specially because it would be just a gasket replacement, and he's very good.
 

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LUW said:
I didn't know that. I was under the impression (read it somewhere? FRM?) that these SE were assembled in SP.

How is the service at Orient? Expensive? I would normally send it to Carregalo, specially because it would be just a gasket replacement, and he's very good.
I tend to prefer to work with authorized service centers for currently in production watches, and even the recently discontinued ones. Reason why: I want accountability from the company responsible for the watches. Also, the authorized service centers are the ones who carry in stock the original parts.

I have sent in to Orient my King Diver for servicing of the movement, replacement of gaskets, crown and crystal (w/ pressure test included) before sending it to Thian Wong (we did a partial trade for his Arnie). The whole servicing cost me around $35 usd, in november last year. The watch came back PERFECT, even better than I left when sent in. They did a nice refinishing of the case and bracelet to fac specs, without my asking, and no extra charges. :-*

I would first try them. Then Carregalo - in that order.

How's Carregalo work? I never sent anything to him.....I am curious, 'cause I want to add him to my list of reliable guys and open up my choices of guys to work with. You have mentioned gaskets change......he has a good stock of multiple models gaskets for the major brands? How can he source them, since he's an independent watchmaker? Also, what's his usual turn around time to sned back a watch?

T.I.A., Luw!
Regards,
CHRIS
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Chris, that price ain't bad!
Parts for the RM1, since it's a modern watch and since Orient Brazil uses mostly the 469xx movements in their watches, are really not an issue for any competent watch maker. I really can't say how is Carregalo's inventory on parts, but so far he has serviced for me Seikos, Omegas, Midos, Tissots and an Eterna and a Zenith, and he did a fantabulous job on all of them. With just a few exceptions all were vintages, so his turn-around time is kind of slow, but for a current watch I don't think it would take too long. For instance, when I sent my Seastar 1000 for him to regulate it, it was a Monday and on the next Thursday or Friday I was with it on my wrist again.
 

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You could try putting a prepared watch with the case back loosened in a ( ziplock) bag with some desicant. Once everythings inside, seal it and fully remove the case back. After a day or so, the air inside should be pretty dry, just replace the case back until it's seated. Take the watch out of the bag and fully tighten the caseback.
I skipped an important part, prepare the watch case, greased oring, caseback has to be cleaned prior to putting in the bag.
 

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I've never been to Brazil- and would love to visit- but I can't believe the humidity is so bad your watches are fogging up because of it. I've lived in Honolulu and other pretty damp places. It's currently winter in Australia where I live and I washed my hands the other day with hot water and my Seiko Electric 370 immediately fogged up- moisture got in through a bad seal on the back and when the temperature dropped when I went outside, condensation formed on the inside of the crystal where the warm and moist air inside the watch came in contact with the cooler watch crystal. This isn't because of humidity, but temperature differentiation in the presence of moist air inside the watch. All I do is take the back off the watch and either put it in the sun to gently warm up and dry out, or dry it with a heater- but gently! Once dry, seal the watch up and if the seal is good it will stay dry in there. How do you dry your shorts?
 

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Simple solution: Pull the crowns of the afflicted watches all the way out to their "setting" position. This will bring the crown gasket clear of the case tube. Then put the watches in your refrigerator for several days. The cooling process removes virtually all moisture from the air as the appliance does its job. After four or five days the moisture should be drawn out of the air within each watch. Before pulling them out of the refrigerator, simply push each crown back to its "O" position, re-sealing the case.

Trust me on this. I've been recommending this for over thirty five years and it rarely fails. If these watches fog again, the gaskets need replacement.


NEVER, NEVER, NEVER
heat a watch. This can damage various plastic parts as well as the gaskets. It will also promote the break-down of the various lubricants within the movement, necessitating a movement service. Excess exposure to sunlight can cause premature fading of the dial, hands, inserts, etc. as well as the possible deformation of plastic parts.
 

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swedefreak said:
Simple solution: Pull the crowns of the afflicted watches all the way out to their "setting" position. This will bring the crown gasket clear of the case tube. Then put the watches in your refrigerator for several days. The cooling process removes virtually all moisture from the air as the appliance does its job. After four or five days the moisture should be drawn out of the air within each watch. Before pulling them out of the refrigerator, simply push each crown back to its "O" position, re-sealing the case.

Trust me on this. I've been recommending this for over thirty five years and it rarely fails. If these watches fog again, the gaskets need replacement.


NEVER, NEVER, NEVER
heat a watch. This can damage various plastic parts as well as the gaskets. It will also promote the break-down of the various lubricants within the movement, necessitating a movement service. Excess exposure to sunlight can cause premature fading of the dial, hands, inserts, etc. as well as the possible deformation of plastic parts.




Wow, what a great tip. Never heard of this, but makes sense. ;)
This is tip of the month, or year? Maybe we can do a thread/sticky with tips of the day/month kinda thing.


Thanks, Dave.
 
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