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Craftsman
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
For those willing to share, I would be interested in what techniques or materials are used to color match white or green hand and dial lume to better match the lume on some of the vintage Seikos. In particular, I am interested in how to obtain that light beige or cream color observed on vintage Seikos. I have been using a Bergeon lume kit in white and it produces good results but the lume is very bone white which is not always a bad thing. Thanks in advance for your replies.
 

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It's an art with a lot of different methods to tint the lume. Myself, I refill my own ink cartridges and use printer ink for tinting. The basic paint mix rules still apply. Blue +yellow = green, blue+yellow+red=brown, etc. I mix the color I want then add a touch to white until I get the desired tint. A drop of black coffee with a touch of yellow creates a very nice cream color. The powdered lume I use has a nice texture to it as well. One thing I found with using the ink is it's not like paint and doesn't encapsulate the lume particles and block the charge and glow nearly as much.



These are a drop of black coffee and a very light touch of green ink mixed with the lume



These are a drop of black coffee and a light touch of yellow ink

 

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Thanks for that! I've always been intrigued but never asked. How do you think coffee would hold up in the long run?
 

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Thanks for that! I've always been intrigued but never asked. How do you think coffee would hold up in the long run?
I don't think it would have any impact. I have a couple that are a few years old and no difference yet.
 

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Craftsman
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Wow. More than I could have hoped for here in terms of information. Thanks.
 

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Craftsman
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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
Another question. When luming a dial, how much lume do you mix up at one time? I would think smaller batches is better or the binder would go off before you complete the job.
 

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On the topic of luming; how do you get an even round shape for diver indices? I've been experimenting with needles (for lack of a better word) used by tattoo/henna artists. They have a bulbous tip in different diameters but I have not had great results yet.
 

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On the topic of luming; how do you get an even round shape for diver indices? I've been experimenting with needles (for lack of a better word) used by tattoo/henna artists. They have a bulbous tip in different diameters but I have not had great results yet.
Very important to keep dial surface completely flat so use a holder of some sort.
Also, lume thickness is important, not too runny.
I use an oiler to apply it.
Straight down and up, no sideways movement that might encourage ovality.
 

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I have been avoiding lume, but now I think I'm ready to start out.

My interest is luming vintage seiko divers, so 6105s, 6309s and probably 6139 chronographs.

So to start of I would be looking at white non glowing (or very little glow) lume with the correct texture.

Any advice would be welcome.

Regards

Dan
 

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Craftsman
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I have been avoiding lume, but now I think I'm ready to start out.

My interest is luming vintage seiko divers, so 6105s, 6309s and probably 6139 chronographs.

So to start of I would be looking at white non glowing (or very little glow) lume with the correct texture.

Any advice would be welcome.

Regards

Dan

Dan, as Noah pointed out, Noctilumina has some very good lume products available.


I started out with one of these kits:
http://www.noctilumina.com/main/kits.html


It's very easy to work with and glows very well.








 

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Craftsman
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Dan, as Noah pointed out, Noctilumina has some very good lume products available.


I started out with one of these kits:
http://www.noctilumina.com/main/kits.html


It's very easy to work with and glows very well.








Tom - Any recommendations on pigment color with this kit. Looks like it is buyer's choice. Have you used the TG45F pigment, tan color, green glow, or did you go with one of the more traditional white or off white pigments? Great thread by the way. Glad I asked this question.
 

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Craftsman
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Tom - Any recommendations on pigment color with this kit. Looks like it is buyer's choice. Have you used the TG45F pigment, tan color, green glow, or did you go with one of the more traditional white or off white pigments? Great thread by the way. Glad I asked this question.

I just went with the standard kit which came with two colors. White that glows green and white that glows blue. I haven't tried any of the pigment colors.
 

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Tom - Any recommendations on pigment color with this kit. Looks like it is buyer's choice. Have you used the TG45F pigment, tan color, green glow, or did you go with one of the more traditional white or off white pigments? Great thread by the way. Glad I asked this question.


If I can jump in, the Noctilumina lumes are really good stuff as mentioned. The fine grain is really even and fairly smooth. The white isn’t quite as ‘pure white’ as the Luminova stuff Esslinger sells maybe but it’s still pretty good. As to the tan, it’s a bit too, hmm, tan. Maybe good for some applications by itself but you may want to cut it with some white. I don’t find it matches the way Seiko lume typically ages on its own. Consider following Noah’s advise and grab some of their non glowing pigment to achieve a better match.

I’ve also had really good success matching lume by adding in a bit of color from colored artist pencils like Prismacolor pencils. I melt a bit in binder thinner then mix in as needed.




Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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If I can jump in, the Noctilumina lumes are really good stuff as mentioned. The fine grain is really even and fairly smooth. The white isn’t quite as ‘pure white’ as the Luminova stuff Esslinger sells maybe but it’s still pretty good. As to the tan, it’s a bit too, hmm, tan. Maybe good for some applications by itself but you may want to cut it with some white. I don’t find it matches the way Seiko lume typically ages on its own. Consider following Noah’s advise and grab some of their non glowing pigment to achieve a better match.

I’ve also had really good success matching lume by adding in a bit of color from colored artist pencils like Prismacolor pencils. I melt a bit in binder thinner then mix in as needed.




Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Seiko ages more of honey tan, it needs that touch of yellow.
 

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Craftsman
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Not just yellow but you would need a tiny amount of red, some orange and a bit of yellow, starting from a green tinted but mostly white lume base. Pigment powders are useful. Orange and green makes brown.
 
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