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The Joker
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Discussion Starter #1
Posted by Richard on TimeZone forum. Some sensible ones here, but I definitely don't agree with #1. (re. Seiko) asleep

"1) Never settle. Compromise.
If a Rolex is really what you want, don't throw away money on a Seiko just to buy. Save that money toward the Rolex. If need be, buy a used model and have it
refurbished.
2) Whenever possible, pay cash.
Don't rob Peter to pay Paul. Avoid credit cards like the plague; interest rates
eat up discounts. Buy what you can afford.

3) Buy for YOU, not someone else.
If you look long and hard enough you will find someone in TZ, or somewhere else
who will criticize your choice no matter what it is. Buy for you, not to impress someone else.

4) Consider the movement.
Consider the movement in the watch. Shoot for in-house or fine base calibers like the Zenith El Primero, Piguet, Lemania, Venus...but don't buy a style you
don't like simply because the movement is a great one. You can't wear a watch
inside-out.

5) Consider the manufacturer.
There are great ones to choose from but never buy just because of the name!
Patek is considered one of the finest, if not the best manufacturer out there.
But if you don't like the designs, don't buy one!

6) You won't become the watch.
The watch won't change you. It is a watch. Einstein had a Patek, Hemingway
wore Rolex and Omega. If you buy a Patek it won't make you a genius, and neither
an Omega or Rolex will improve your writing.

7) Size matters.
Large watches are a fad and a style. Some really look good. Consider your wrist
size because a really oversized watch on a small wrist looks sloppy. If you do
buy a large watch, make sure your shirt cuffs will fit over it. You don't want
to have to redo your wardrobe to fit your watch!

8)Get Insurance.You will sleep better.
9) There is always going to be a better deal.
Shortly after you make a purchase, you will spot that exact same model selling
for less. It is one of life's little jokes. Don't let it bother you.

10) Keep in mind that salespeople are usually only objective about watches that
they sell.

11) The journey can be more fun than the destination.
Shortly after a purchase you may experience a let down. Let it pass, it's normal.

12) If it is broke, fix it.
To err is human. It is better to fix a mistake than try to live with it. If you
really aren't happy with a purchase, get rid of it!

13) Consider color.
All stainless steel, all white gold, all platinum with a bracelet goes with
everything. With a black strap, almost everything.
18k&black strap is dressy. 18k&brown strap is elegant but more casual, and
looks good with browns, tans, blues, yellow, green, and sometimes even gray.
White dials are dressier and easier to read, black dials are more cool and sporty.

14) Accuracy is relative.
Your self-winding watch isn't as accurate as your quartz. However it can be 99%
accurate. Off by just a few seconds out of over 80,000 each day is pretty amazing.

15) Take care of your good watches.
Get them serviced, keep them clean. They'll last longer than you will.

16) This is want, not need.
No one ever needs a luxury watch, this is about want. If you ask yourself, "do
I need this?" the honest answer is always, "no."

17) Never buy a watch as an investment.
Some watches will retain value, most don't. The watch that actually appreciates
in value is unique and chances are it will be your grandchildren who benefit,
not you.

18) No one watch will statisfy you completely. There is no single definitive model.
19) The more you know, the less you need.
A collection of 4 exceptional watches is better than a collection of 10 mediocre
ones.

20) Only engrave if it is a special gift.
21) Buy what you will wear, not for an occasion.
Don't run out and buy a dressy watch for just one special night. You probably
have one you can wear that will be just fine, or don't wear one at all.

22) Wear it.
If it has been two months since you wore it, you don't really like it. Get something you want to wear.

23) Limited is usually a marketing term.
Limited to 5,000 pieces is not limited. Limited to 2,000 isn't either.
Really limited is 30. Or 10. Or one.

24) You don't have to justify to anyone except yourself.
Someone will someday say, "you paid that much for a watch!!!" You are not obligated to explain, and they won't understand anyway.

25) Don't look at the Patek on the other guy's wrist and be envious. Look at the
watch on your wrist and be happy. Don't judge anyone by the watch they wear,
including yourself."
 

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normdiaz said:
Posted by Richard on TimeZone forum. Some sensible ones here, but I definitely don't agree with #1. (re. Seiko)
Maybe he chose a bad example, but I totally agree with him: if you want a MM300, do not get a Sumo because "that is what I can afford". I think he was talking with this in mind.
 

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The Joker
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Discussion Starter #3
LUW said:
Maybe he chose a bad example, but I totally agree with him: if you want a MM300, do not get a Sumo because "that is what I can afford". I think he was talking with this in mind.
I like your phrasing better.
 

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I've bought numerous affordables through the years, and they led eventually to a few nicer watches. I felt like I learned a lot about my likes and dislikes in the process. I never felt like I was throwing money away on Seikos. Had I saved and saved to buy some expensive watch I thought I wanted, I might have been greatly disappointed.


He does hit the nail on the head with #18. There is no "Holy Grail".
 

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# 16 A Great Point Yes the answer is always NO BUT when I think of my 6159-7001 or 6105- NOS or some Grand Seikos I have I can after I say NO, I don't need any of them
but I sure am Happy I have them.
There is Absolutely Nothing really Needed, except the saying "Ya got ya Health Ya got it all" I can still hear some of the old Jewish Grandparents of friends I grew up with
Pinching my cheek and saying that to me.


Now i'm sure someone will say well Food or LOVE all beautiful things But in the Picture of # 16 Did I ever need anything other then a $17.00 Timex with a black leather strap lol NO


But I sure am happy to have my Seikos.
Great Post thanks
 

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This is not intended as criticism, but these are definitely not my rules for collecting watches, and I don't care for them. asleep
I would say in general each watch collector develops her/his own set of "rules".
Cheers,
 

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I like to distinguish between a watch collector and a watch enthusiast. A collector has some scheme in mind when he gets watches maybe a Seiko Collector maybe a diver collector maybe a chrono collector maybe a vintage collector.Somehow there is method to the collection. The Enthusiast just buys what fancies him and doesn't worry about any theme. Usually collectors tend to get more involved in the tech aspects of watches and do their own service while enthusuasts tend to buy and wear. That's how I see it.
 

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Though I do agree with most if not all of those premises, since I don't consider myself a collector (I'm just an enthusiast) they really don't apply to me.
 

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The Joker
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Discussion Starter #10
NelsonE said:
I like to distinguish between a watch collector and a watch enthusiast. A collector has some scheme in mind when he gets watches maybe a Seiko Collector maybe a diver collector maybe a chrono collector maybe a vintage collector.Somehow there is method to the collection. The Enthusiast just buys what fancies him and doesn't worry about any theme. Usually collectors tend to get more involved in the tech aspects of watches and do their own service while enthusuasts tend to buy and wear. That's how I see it.
I agree with those distinctions. But IMO, the line between the 2 types get blurred, especially when the enthusiasts "rub elbows" with the collectors on forums such as this and get interested in watch "tech aspects" and even perform some minor "servicing" items like changing non-integrated straps/bracelets, mounting/changing deployants, and changing batteries on their simpler quartz watches.
 

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Norm, I don't know, at least in my case, though I definitively do not consider myself a collector, I do get turned on by some technical aspects of a watch and sometimes think about "improving" a watch to my liking.
 
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