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Discussion Starter #1
I was discussing rust the other day with a mechanic, and he uses Coke to remove rust from his project cars (cheap coke in a big container for bumpers and what not) and Cilit Bang (you'll know it if your from the UK). I've never heard of this before, and wondering if anyone in the forum has ever tried this, and if so,what was the outcome?
Regards, David
 

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Well I do remember using it to clean guns, rocket launcers and stuff. Back in my army days, perhaps I should point out!

Anyway, it worked pretty well on rust and solidified dirt and old guck. I don't know if it really was good, or simply better than what else we had! I may have a go with some coke in the ultrasonic cleaner though ...
 

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Coke and aluminium foil for cleaning chrome bumpers.
 

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Coke...the soft drink...for cleaning rust from watches? Yes...a popular home remedy for tasks requiring a mild (physiological pH buffered) solution of phosphoric acid. What about the sugar deposits you are going to leave? If you are going to use chemistry, a diluted solution of rust/lime/scale remover...(eg CLR)...a more potent solution of phosphoric acid...can work more effectively...or destroy more effectively. One problem with "rust" is that it is a salt of part of the structural (ferrous) base material. To remove it chemically, you have to dissolve it (with an acid). When you do, the portion of the base material which had reacted to begin with is dissolved, as well. If there is a lot of rust, when you remove it, there may not be enough material left. First line of removal in watchmaking is generally "physical" (eraser, scratchbrush, dental tool)...then additional chemical treatment if necessary, to get to the remaining residue in hard to reach places...followed by immediate rinsing and drying to prevent more oxidation (ie. rust). If your hairspring is rusty, you'll need a new balance complete. Coke...the soft drink...not a watchmaker's tool.
 

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Also can be used for Household's, Kitchen, Bathrooms, Floors,
toilets stains, even wood surfaces. I use it to soak locked up engine blocks and just pour
it into the cylinders, and let it sit for a while till you can move the piston with
the turning of the crank shaft. Guns , parts of machinery, etc. Small engine
uses and a lot more.
It has been an all around use for many years.
 

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It's good for cleaning oil off clutch plates in an emergency.......
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thank you all for commenting, and a very informative post Benchguy. I'm going to purchase some and leave a case back in there and see what the outcome is, it's pitted and rusted, not to mention over polished, so no loss. It's a case I have for a 6616 that has light rust deposits on it that I really wanted to clean, was worried the case may be stained, or completely lost, is there a time frame for soaking in the Coke?
He also mentioned that in America, their coke is used to remove blood stains off roads, whether this is true or not, I'm not sure.
Regards, David
 

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Friend has a wrecking and tow business here. He use's Citrus juices for that Blood stains and it does a good job.
The Towing business has certain rules and regulations as to what is to be used and not.

When Asphalt is stained they use ........" Grass Burner Torch's " to totally discard the stains. Then it is sprayed
with oil so as to it not getting dried up and leaving a non asphalt spot. Then re burned just a little more to melt
the asphalt and it will blend together again and be solid.
There is also the Oil lifting soaking product that they prinkle on oil spills that is used and then sweeped up and it lifts all
those stains, like used on Drag Strip's for engine failures and oil spill's.
It is better to burn it up than use chemicals and what not on Asphalt because it lifts the oil in it. That would only
leave the crushed gravel bare and not sealing it and it will be only sandy in use.

Asphalt when made at the Plant, is at a temperature of ......
(2000 degrees ) then laid down for paving. When hauling asphalt the trucks are sprayed with Diesel oil in the
box so as to still contain and make the asphalt not stick and release it good from the trucks when dumped into
the hopper of the ( Barber Greene Paver.)
Using chemicals would leave a dry spot on the pavement and that will eventually start cracks and then it has to
be stripped down and re-paved again.
_______________________________________________________________________________________________
Note:
Coke a Cola is corrosive in a way, so controlled use is recommended using it for doing things.
_______________________________________________________________________________________________
( paving cont'd.)
But then people do as they please do get things done in their own ways, and if it works good they still do it even if it is Illegal.
Hope this helps a little
Aloha
 

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I guess this thread has slipped from "Watchmaking" to "Tinkering"...but not necessarily tinkering on watches?

@diesel: long term in Coke or carbonated beverage of your choice, lemon juice, vinegar...won't hurt a thing. Long term in CLR may cause certain alloys to darken or develop other salts (albeit not technically iron oxide or "rust"). Also, one of the keys to success is using physical means to remove a much as possible, reducing the time and improving the effectiveness of chemical means.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I guess this thread has slipped from "Watchmaking" to "Tinkering"...but not necessarily tinkering on watches?

@diesel: long term in Coke or carbonated beverage of your choice, lemon juice, vinegar...won't hurt a thing.
Pow, just the ticket, I'll give it a go for sure, needs to get a scratch brush and get physical, is there different grades of them? Sorry for the bone questions and my humour.
Regards, David
 

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Doesn't matter whether cleaning a pallet fork or dissolving roadkill: coke is da ****!
 

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It is doing a great job tearing up the ...........
Inside's of everyone too ". It is a great
" Intestinal destroyer ", and bad for the health too.
Oh it is flushing many too and it is also taking their intestine's down the poor health trail.
 

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Coke cleaner and other household chemicals

Cola and Ketchup use Phosphoric Acid which is excellent for cleaning Stainless steel. It is common in industry for removing weld discolouration. At work we use it for cleaning up after laser cutting stainless - it removes discolouration and re-cast from the back of the cuts in thin sheet.

Sometimes it gets boosted with Citric Acid (Lemon/orange juice).

One thing to watch for is that the application for the chemicals also controls the associated additives. Cola won't contain additives for wetting surfaces. So a Phosphoric Acid based cleaner will usually be more effective than the food products using the Acid.

I have started to use Mr Muscle Touch up cleaner for bracelet and case cleaning - not rust removal. Cases tend to be stainless anyway. Mr Muscle is Lactic Acid - other Mr Muscle products use other chemicals so read labels. It has worked for me - but I do rinse parts in water afterwards and dry as best as I can.

I don't use washing-up liquid for anything - even ultrasonic baths. That line of cleaners tends to include salt - and that's not helpful.

As far as I know the reaction with Phosphoric Acid and rust is to form a phosphate salt from the rust oxide. The rust (ferrous) oxide is not dissolved, just converted. The previous advice is correct - remove all loose scale/rust powder first. Phosphates make the surface black - and it's not a rust preventative, as the coating can be porous.

The advantage of chemicals is that the affected area can be targeted and the rest left undamaged. The disadvantage is that it will leave pits where the corrosion has been removed. They cannot convert back oxides to parent metal and fill in craters.

I have also tried cold tea which makes a mild acid after a few days. It sort of worked but I wouldn't recommend it. I haven't tried baking soda and electrolysis - that's for my retirement and I need something to do!! The web is full of suggestions for things to try - once.

One thing I have found lately and the hard way at work - eco chemicals tend to have a very much narrower effectiveness 'window' than the good old nasty stuff. Trike/genklene and perchlorothene all works but will harm you. Cola and Ketchup won't kill you and can be flushed down the drains, and that has a lot going for it for home and work these days.

Cheers
David
 

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Cola and Ketchup use Phosphoric Acid which is excellent for cleaning Stainless steel. It is common in industry for removing weld discolouration. At work we use it for cleaning up after laser cutting stainless - it removes discolouration and re-cast from the back of the cuts in thin sheet.

Sometimes it gets boosted with Citric Acid (Lemon/orange juice).

One thing to watch for is that the application for the chemicals also controls the associated additives. Cola won't contain additives for wetting surfaces. So a Phosphoric Acid based cleaner will usually be more effective than the food products using the Acid.

I have started to use Mr Muscle Touch up cleaner for bracelet and case cleaning - not rust removal. Cases tend to be stainless anyway. Mr Muscle is Lactic Acid - other Mr Muscle products use other chemicals so read labels. It has worked for me - but I do rinse parts in water afterwards and dry as best as I can.

I don't use washing-up liquid for anything - even ultrasonic baths. That line of cleaners tends to include salt - and that's not helpful.

As far as I know the reaction with Phosphoric Acid and rust is to form a phosphate salt from the rust oxide. The rust (ferrous) oxide is not dissolved, just converted. The previous advice is correct - remove all loose scale/rust powder first. Phosphates make the surface black - and it's not a rust preventative, as the coating can be porous.

The advantage of chemicals is that the affected area can be targeted and the rest left undamaged. The disadvantage is that it will leave pits where the corrosion has been removed. They cannot convert back oxides to parent metal and fill in craters.

I have also tried cold tea which makes a mild acid after a few days. It sort of worked but I wouldn't recommend it. I haven't tried baking soda and electrolysis - that's for my retirement and I need something to do!! The web is full of suggestions for things to try - once.

One thing I have found lately and the hard way at work - eco chemicals tend to have a very much narrower effectiveness 'window' than the good old nasty stuff. Trike/genklene and perchlorothene all works but will harm you. Cola and Ketchup won't kill you and can be flushed down the drains, and that has a lot going for it for home and work these days.

Cheers
David
That's all a lot of it David you got it Man .........:72::pDT_Armataz_01_37::iagree:
Good presentation to all that.
 

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I don't use washing-up liquid for anything - even ultrasonic baths. That line of cleaners tends to include salt - and that's not helpful. A

As far as I know the reaction with Phosphoric Acid and rust is to form a phosphate salt from the rust oxide. The rust (ferrous) oxide is not dissolved, just converted. B

Trike/genklene and perchlorothene all works but will harm you. C
A-US cleaning agents are usually selected for their cavitation properties, as well as their chemical/physical properties. The physical impact of formation/collapse of the bubbles results in greater effectiveness of US compared to standard aggitation.

B-This is the reaction: 2 H3PO4 + Fe2O3 → 2 FePO4 + 3 H2O. The phospate salt of iron is soluable in water...thus, the iron is reacted into a soluable salt and the oxide is reacted to become water...all of which will rinse away. The reaction will not reduce the iron back into the alloy, so it will be removed from the parent material, leaving defects (ie. "pits").

C-These are all organic solvents. They do not react with Fe2O3 , and solubility is very low. These are not likely to be effective agents for rust removal. Further, improper use is an immediate health hazard.
 
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