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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I grew up and spent my entire childhood in metro-Detroit, Michigan - Motor City. I lived in the same house my entire life in a little suburb called Berkley - 11 mile and Woodward Ave. for those of you who know the area. And outside of our family room window was a lilac bush. For anyone who knows this part of the country and especially during the 60s and 70s, the winters lasted forever and were harsh. Our house was built in 1916 so every fall the storm windows went in and the house was buttoned up. Outside activities were always in heavy winter clothing. But as springtime rolled around, things greened up and that lilac bush eventually bloomed. And when it did, it meant a lot of things:
  • the storm windows were out and windows in the house were opened for the first time in half a year, and the aroma of that lilac was the first thing I smelled.
  • no more winter coats
  • my birthday was getting close (May)
  • we were on the final stretch of school
  • the neighborhood was green and the days were longer - time to get out the bike
A few years back I planted a couple lilacs outside our family room window. Last weekend they hadn't quiet bloomed but during the week they did. While doing yard work today I stopped several times to "smell the lilacs" and they took me right back to my childhood in Detroit. Unfortunately they don't stay bloomed too long but I plan to make time every day to enjoy them.

447683


447684


447685


Lemonade and iced tea - spring is here! Enjoy everyone.

447686
 

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Love your post,
I grew up on the north Island of New Zealand I never saw snow until I was about 11 or 12, (My father took us tramping , what you call trekking on a mountain range about 5 hours south of our town (lord of the rings mountain of doom) and naturally we got hit with a blizzard, we didn't pass )
we wore short pants to school summer & winter & played rugby in bare feet. A harsh winter to us was when we saw Ice on the puddles ( at dawn, maybe 3-4 times a year, but it would melt when the sun hit it) now living in Queensland Australia, I do miss our mild NZ winters, here we don't get much of a seasonal change apart from dry or wet,but not much wet lately.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Love your post,
I grew up on the north Island of New Zealand I never saw snow until I was about 11 or 12, (My father took us tramping , what you call trekking on a mountain range about 5 hours south of our town (lord of the rings mountain of doom) and naturally we got hit with a blizzard, we didn't pass )
we wore short pants to school summer & winter & played rugby in bare feet. A harsh winter to us was when we saw Ice on the puddles ( at dawn, maybe 3-4 times a year, but it would melt when the sun hit it) now living in Queensland Australia, I do miss our mild NZ winters, here we don't get much of a seasonal change apart from dry or wet,but not much wet lately.
Thanks! Having grown up in a part of the country that experienced a change of seasons, it's what I was/am used to. I went to college in Florida and at the end of four years had to get back to the north country. I couldn't get used to the lack of/significantly reduced seasonal changes.
 

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Thanks! Having grown up in a part of the country that experienced a change of seasons, it's what I was/am used to. I went to college in Florida and at the end of four years had to get back to the north country. I couldn't get used to the lack of/significantly reduced seasonal changes.
 

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I was lucky to have spent a lot of my earlier childhood on a farm (4 until 10) and for a lad it was a great way of life and while there we lived in a converted single deck bus, pretty cool bit of kit then and it would be now.

Up to my knees in muck a lot of the time, fetching the cows in, collecting sheep dung (for the tomatoes) breeding rabbits to sell at the market, my own chickens a sheep etc, birds nesting, climbing trees and hay stacks, roving the fields with a spear, sword, bow and arrow hunting, catapult, sheaf knife strapped to my waist :) and the food was or seemed to be was great, happy days.

I always enjoyed harvest time as it was all go from first light until dark.

As a treat we would all gather in the main farm house on a Sunday night to watch TV and the farmer would share out a bag of sweets for us kids (heaven). One of my favorite food stuffs was blackberry vinegar which we would pour onto a chunk of Yorkshire pudding (superb) and sometimes if the farmers wife was feeling good she would give us kids a small glass filled with it.

For kids on the farm the main drink was cold water as only the adult workers got tea but us kids did have our own ginger beer plants but I was never that keen on it, they where good days and I often look back on them with fond memories.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Wonderful memories indeed John - thanks for sharing. My mom is from England and so we would drive from Detroit over to Windsor Ontario frequently where she could purchase ingredients and foods that she couldn't get locally. Most were good, a few were not (Marmite) :sick: Yorkshire pudding was a frequent dish as a kid. Haven't had it for years.
 
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