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Discussion Starter #1
Hi,
I am new to the forum and this looked like the right place to ask this question.

I am looking for any data sheets or technical info on a Casio Quartz Digital watch model No: AT-551 Module 320.
From what I can discover this model was only produced in 1983/4, it is a dual time digital & analogue display with calculator function input via a reactive glass crystal.

The watch stopped working about 20 years ago and I can't remember what was the cause, I have become interested in restoring my collection of worn out watches accumulated over 60 years.

I fitted a new battery and the digital display lights up but doesn't respond to input and the analogue display doesn't move, I can't find any info about stripping down the movement or testing procedures, Casio it seems don't remember even making it, a search of their site brings no result.

So I am hoping that someone may still have data relating to this model, I will add some photos for identification purposes, thanking you for any help you may be able to give!

Max
 

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I'm afraid the chance of getting any tech documentation for a Casio module is slim to say the least. They tended to be "throwaway" modules even in the official repair centre, so no need for repair docs to ever have existed outside the factory.

User guides won't help much with the problems you have, but the good news is that at least one of your problems is likely to be a fairly straightforward one.

Firstly, a quick check - have you shorted the "AC" pad (clearly visible in your photo) to the battery after fitting the cell? Most Casios either do nothing or do apparently random stuff if you don't. That may be sucky-egg tuition, in which case I apologise, but it's an easily missed step if you're not familiar with them!

Assuming it's been reset as above, the lack of response to the pushers is likely to be the pushers themselves that are sticking / clogged with dust.

You can check that by looking how far they move with the back off - if the little spring contact that they press on doesn't move far enough to touch the circuit board when you press the buttons then the issue is with the buttons themselves rather than the movement. You can confirm that by shorting the little gold pads near the pushers to the steel backplate. Every time you should one it should work like pressing that button.

The analogue side is a little more difficult. It may simply start up when you AC the module or it may have a fault. If it's faulty then you really need some basic diagnostic kit to make life easier.

The first thing is to find out if the fault is electronic or mechanical. If the digital side is working ok then it's probably a mechanical fault but there's little more frustrating than stripping and servicing a movement to then find that, say, the coil's faulty and no longer available!

If it is a mechanical problem then it should be a straightforward one to strip and service if you have any experience with quartz watches.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Hi Joe,
Thanks for your reply, I have not shorted the "AC" pad, I don't know a thing about Casio quartz systems so I will give that a try and see if it makes any difference.
I kind of figured that it is probably defunct, it failed when it was just out of warranty and it cost half the cost of the watch to have a new module fitted, I am just starting to play around with watches, trying to restore some of my past workhorses that have lain idle and forgotten for years.
I have a Seiko quartz of similar vintage, I was able to download a data sheet for it from this site, and it seems to be in about the same boat, put in a new battery and no life what so ever, and the testing procedure suggests that if the battery has full power then the circuit board needs to be replaced.

I am not much interested in quartz movements because of the problem of redundancy within a short time of manufacture the caravan has moved on and parts are no longer available, at least mechanical movements you have some chance of finding a donor movement for parts.

If I can't get them working I may try and re-power them with modern quartz movements just for the hell of it.

Thanks again for your help.

Regards,
Max
 

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Wel it sure is a very cool watch!
http://research.microsoft.com/en-us/um/people/bibuxton/buxtoncollection/detail.aspx?id=227

Insert the battery and short the "AC" contact with the plus of the battery, the watch should come to life.
You might need to try it multiple times. If that fails, just wait. More than once a "dead" watch came to life after hours, even days waiting with a fresh battery.

LCD watches can start working after disassembly and cleaning. Analog quartz watches often are working, but need cleaning and new lube in the mechanical part, all the cogs are jammed with old oil.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Hi Dutchsiberia,

Have not had a chance to try that out yet, too many other things happening at the moment, will surely give it a go the way I see it I have nothing to loose it doesn't go anyway. Thanks for your reply.

Max
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Update, shorted the "AC" contact and the battery and the digital display came to life, all functions working, the analogue display is still not running so it looks like a service is in order!
Thanks to both of you for your good advice.

Max
 

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Great! The analogue part might suffer from resistance from dried lubricants or the coil could be broken. Keep the watch warm (pocket) for a while, it might start working. If the seconds hand starts to "twitch" then it's definitely dried lube :)
 

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Wel it sure is a very cool watch!
http://research.microsoft.com/en-us/um/people/bibuxton/buxtoncollection/detail.aspx?id=227

Insert the battery and short the "AC" contact with the plus of the battery, the watch should come to life.
You might need to try it multiple times. If that fails, just wait. More than once a "dead" watch came to life after hours, even days waiting with a fresh battery.

LCD watches can start working after disassembly and cleaning. Analog quartz watches often are working, but need cleaning and new lube in the mechanical part, all the cogs are jammed with old oil.
Hi, any similar 'tricks' that I could try on this ORIENT ANA-DIGITAL K69103-40 that I picked up for $1 and sadly refuses to show any signs of life with a new battery fitted :( All of the pushers move freely and it has a screw down crown. Can't find anything about this watch on the internet :mad:
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Update.

Today I finally got around to tackling the mechanical movement of the watch ( read that as worked up the courage).
Without any data sheet had to fly by the seat of the pants, however all went well and the problem was solved, a tiny speck of gunk in one of the wheels, and the watch is now fully operational after 25 years rest.

Thanks to all who provided helpful advice it is much appreciated.

Max
 
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