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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
You need to give credit where credit is due- quote your sources going forward to avoid being accused of plagiarism:
http://www.clockmaker.com.au/rolex/rolex_case_polishing.html

While I'm here, I'd also recommend removing all casing components before refinishing (such as the bezel in this case) to avoid rounding off separate, protruding surfaces.

If I could remember where I found thus I would have gladly given credit but I just couldn't :) - it was a while ago I found it????

But fair do's, I found it posted by someone on the RWI forum in about 2010 - no source was given :(
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Your watch remains unpolished?
Indeed :) if you want to polish a watch/strap that doesn't have scratches (I'm talking nothing really worse than say desk diving swirls) then I suggest you buy some Cape Cod. It's pretty cheap but can work wonders ???
 

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The procedure shown below was passed to me by my father (an to him by his brother Mihajlo Hacko, Master Watchmaker since 1948. who still does his own watch repairs!)
Boooooo! Disappointing that you'd try to pass this off as yours, especially this part. Did your own uncle/father teach you how to copy/paste? Actually, I think it's worse than that, as when I went to quote this it looked like you saved all the photos from the original post to your own photo bucket and rebuilt the article here. Boooooooo!

That said, have you personally used this technique? Would love to see your own work /results.
 

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Not only plagiarism, it's also wrong advice as I've mentioned in another thread.

To remove scratches and desnts from polished surfaces, no sanding is needed. The correct procedure is buffing, as illustrated here:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YMuWrI-sCj8

Sanding only removes metal and ruins the original surfaces and edges. Buffing instead moves metal and is the less proper procedure used by professionals.
 

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220 grade is really coarse, I wouldn't use it on a watch, but then again I wouldn't try to remove all the scratches and dents if they are too deep. If I need to use paper then I start at 1000, and I attach it to something rigid to ensure it stays flat and avoid doing too much damage to case edges. I go up to 2400 grade, then buff with two grades of polishing compound, then finish with a duster and liquid metal polish.
 

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I do it exactly the same but instead of a big polish wheel, which is costly I use a pencil grinder with the same disk but smaller with diamond paste

uploadfromtaptalk1468079871523.jpg

Sent from my HUAWEI P7-L10 using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Not only plagiarism, it's also wrong advice as I've mentioned in another thread.

To remove scratches and desnts from polished surfaces, no sanding is needed. The correct procedure is buffing, as illustrated here:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YMuWrI-sCj8

Sanding only removes metal and ruins the original surfaces and edges. Buffing instead moves metal and is the less proper procedure used by professionals.
Get over yourself!!! I never claimed I wrote the tutorial and yes I have used it several times !!
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
Boooooo! Disappointing that you'd try to pass this off as yours, especially this part. Did your own uncle/father teach you how to copy/paste? Actually, I think it's worse than that, as when I went to quote this it looked like you saved all the photos from the original post to your own photo bucket and rebuilt the article here. Boooooooo!

That said, have you personally used this technique? Would love to see your own work /results.
As I said, I never claimed I wrote the tutorial and found it on another watch forum in 2010 - but it probably best I just delete the photo's etc and leave the quoted the link !!!
 

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Can any of you senior members guide me to a tutorial for restoring the "brushed" finish on a stainless steel case that has been over-polished? Thanks.
 

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I never said I wrote the tutorial !!!
You may not have wished to give that impression but you most certainly did. I remember looking at your post and picturing the grandson of a Japanese watchmaker living in Whitby and wondering how the fish and chips held up in comparison with Sushi.
 

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Discussion Starter #18 (Edited)
Boooooo! Disappointing that you'd try to pass this off as yours, especially this part. Did your own uncle/father teach you how to copy/paste? Actually, I think it's worse than that, as when I went to quote this it looked like you saved all the photos from the original post to your own photo bucket and rebuilt the article here. Boooooooo!

That said, have you personally used this technique? Would love to see your own work /results.
Surely, if I had really wanted to pass this off as my own work - I would have the intelligence to change the wording ?? As I previously said I found it on another watch forum in 2010 with no source given.

I have now removed everything and just left the link that was posted - I can't really do anymore than that.

As to whether it works, I would suggest that you ask Nick on this forum?

But here is a photo of my sand paper just to prove I do actually own and use it - Note the jewellers/watch fine grade paper 40u and 6um

 

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Discussion Starter #19
You may not have wished to give that impression but you most certainly did. I remember looking at your post and picturing the grandson of a Japanese watchmaker living in Whitby and wondering how the fish and chips held up in comparison with Sushi.
Where is Whitby???? Never heard of the place :)
 

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Surely, if I had really wanted to pass this off as my own work - I would have the intelligence to change the wording ?? As I previously said I found it on another watch forum in 2010 with no source given.

I have now removed everything and just left the link that was posted - I can't really do anymore than that.

As to whether it works, I would suggest that you ask Nick on this forum?

But here is a photo of my sand paper just to prove I do actually own and use it - Note the jewellers/watch fine grade paper 40u and 6um
Sounds like an honest mistake. No harm/no foul. Sorry, I hope I did not offend with my response. Welcome to the forum. I'm new, too, but the wealth of knowledge among the senior members is pretty amazing.
 
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