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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hey there !

While waiting for my 4205 to be serviced by a Seikool* gentelman of the forum, I've acquired an ancient love of mine : Seiko M158-5009.
For the people not familiar with this model, it has a cool panoramic yellow display, simple access to the functions and lovely case shape. It's often called the "Seiko Pan Am" due to it's 3 different time zones (current, world time and GMT) and so it was used by airline pilots in the 70's/80's.

I've chosen this item :


Not in excellent condition but very fine for me. Another awesome gentelman of the forum is going to switch the crystal (which has chips and scratches all over) with a new one and I'll polish the case and bracelet.

At last, my question is about polishing the clasp of the bracelet : it contains the classic "Seiko SQ" 3D embossing which is, in my own limited experience, not easy to polish evenly.
I've used several times the method described in some other thread of the forum (which is basically sanding by hand from heavy to super fine grain and finishing with a polishing cloth tool on a dremel at lowest speed). The result is great, mirror like polishing but around the "Seiko SQ" and between the letters I get a kind of "glow" due to impossibility to access some areas with the sandpaper.

I guess I'm missing something here, and as I supposed I'm not the only one, I hope someone here has figured out how to make it look good.

Thank you for reading me pals.

* Seikool = Seiko + Cool !
 

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I totally understand. If you really want those spaces between the letters to be as refinished as the rest of the clasp, you might consider just buying a NOS clasp. Seiko Service Center still has a lot.

I say this because after all the effort to restore, if the areas you cannot restore will bother you, save yourself the time investment and go NOS. Now if the small areas are something you can live with, the rewarding feeling that restoring it gives you is far better than the difference.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Good point !
The watch is from aug. 1977, I'll take the dimensions and see if I can find a clasp one day. I know that the full bracelet is impossible to find NOS.

Thank you.

I totally understand. If you really want those spaces between the letters to be as refinished as the rest of the clasp, you might consider just buying a NOS clasp. Seiko Service Center still has a lot.

I say this because after all the effort to restore, if the areas you cannot restore will bother you, save yourself the time investment and go NOS. Now if the small areas are something you can live with, the rewarding feeling that restoring it gives you is far better than the difference.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I've polished completely the clasps, all scratches are gone (some where HUGE, needed to use grain 100 sandpaper) but now I've realized that this bracelet used to be two tons :

1. Center of the bracelet is polished.
2. Left and right pieces and clasp is matte brushed finished.

The whole bracelet is polished now, and I really don't know how to get a matte polished finished back. I read that sandblasting may be a solution, but I don't know how to do it.

By the way the 3D embossing "Seiko SQ" does glow a little, but that's ok with me. It's better than when I received it.
 

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Most of the seiko clasps look like they are bead blasted, I would assume very difficult to reproduce. You would need a bead blaster and care would need to be used to not ruin the Seiko SQ logos.

Mark
 
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