The Watch Site banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I don't have any experience in movement tinkering, but I'm pretty interested. I learn by doing, so I'd love to pick up a cheap movement to take apart and reassemble; something I could bin and replace if I mess up (maybe a super basic Eta, Sellita, or Miyota?).

Does something like this exist? If so, is this something I could do if I have no experience but am a black belt in Google-fu?

I also saw those clock puzzles on Amazon. Maybe I should start with one of those?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,980 Posts
Watch schools typically start with a ETA 649x. You can get a Chinese equivalent for not much money, which is what I’d recommend as a first foray. Starting with a smaller caliber that has automatic winding and calendar complications isn’t setting yourself up for success, and the 649x will teach you more about the fundamentals and history of movement design than a later caliber built more for efficiency and size.

I also recommend starting with a working watch, so that you know who to blame if it doesn’t run afterwards;-). Seriously though, diagnostics and repair is a different thing than taking apart and putting together- baby steps.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,832 Posts
As above, go for the 6497 or 6498 Chinese clone. They're big and easy to work on. There is also a service guide that you can download for the genuine ETA movement that will help you out.
If you get it back together you can celebrate by buying and case, dial and hands to suit off eBay and build your own watch.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
480 Posts
I've been learning on 7002 divers cos they seem(ed) to be easy to come by both cheap and broken (and make a nice watch when fixed). Theres also tons of info/photo shoots here on strip downs and rebuilds if you get stuck or can't get it running. Also 7009s are even cheaper and good for a lot of spares for them eg balances.

Having now tried a couple of 6309s, apart from the automatic mechanism I actually prefer working on these too.

Sent from my Pixel 3a XL using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
63 Posts
I would go for a 7s26!!!
There are so many videos online that explain service procedure step by step and would be very good for a start!!!

Sent from my SM-G950N using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
I cut my teeth on 6309 and 7009. They were cheap and plenty full on ebay. Just be warned, if you buy from India, you don't know what you'll find inside. The movement often doesn't match the dial or case back!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,991 Posts
I would go for a 7s26!!!
There are so many videos online that explain service procedure step by step and would be very good for a start!!!

Sent from my SM-G950N using Tapatalk
This is the one that I’m using. I bought a new one for very little money and I have fully disassembled it and cleaned the components. I’m going to lube and reassemble as soon as I get some time!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Dag. This is all great info. I'm finding a lot of info on quite a few of these suggestions. The Chinese 6498 might be the route I take; I found them for about $35 USD a pop. Does that seem right?

After a successful 6498, I'll venture into Seiko land.

I also kept my eye out for 6309 and obviously saw a ton of the mumbai specials. If I find a couple cheap 6309s, I'll probably jump on them.

I'm assuming once you take one apart, it sort of translates to other movements?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
90 Posts
I started with a Seiko 8800c stopwatch. Simple 7 jewel movement, large size, and detailed Seiko tech docs are available. Available on YJ for not too much money.

The ETA 649x clones are a good option too. When I took the Intro to Watchmaking course at AWCI, we learned on the ETA 6497.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
I just realized NH36s are $30 a pop. Are these a bad idea to start with? No one mentioned, but they are cheap and plentiful.

Another question: what does "servicing" include? Oiling all the contact points pretty much?

And a serious thank you to all those that are chiming in. I appreciate the info!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
I just realized NH36s are $30 a pop. Are these a bad idea to start with? No one mentioned, but they are cheap and plentiful.

Another question: what does "servicing" include? Oiling all the contact points pretty much?

And a serious thank you to all those that are chiming in. I appreciate the info!
[Disclaimer: I'm just a tinkerer, and very inexperienced with working on watch movements.] I started on NH35/36s, got them all back together and working. This is with never having worked on a movement before, so I'd say it's easy enough. (Still a fairly high difficulty level for any movement, and I did have to invest in tools, which are crucial.) The Seikos are small though, the larger 6497/98 would probably be easier especially with oiling and assembly. There are Seiko manuals online that are very helpful, and parts are abundant. Also for the price difference ($10?) I would go with genuine vs clones, you'll probably have a much longer-lasting result.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
  • Micro tweezers
  • Micro screwdriver set
  • Repair mat
  • Crystal press
  • Caseback removal tool
  • Rodico
  • Hand-pull/push tools
  • Finger cots
  • Movement holder
Is there anything else I need before I try and take stuff apart and reassemble? Is a loupe necessary? Do I need any lubricants?
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top