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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I am overhauling a Bell-Matic 4006-6010 I recently picked up from a fellow SCWF forum member. I have the watch completely stripped down. In reviewing the Seiko service manual it states the alarm spring in the main plate is self lubricating and does not need to be removed. It outlines removing the arbor for that spring which I have done. It goes on to state you can clean the main plate in the ultrasonic with the alarm spring in place.

I have seen some service videos done on Youtube on the 4006 i.e. Mark Lovick's "Watch Repair Channel" and he removed and serviced the alarm spring. Looking for any guidance here. My alarm spring looks pretty clean and there does not appear to be any heavy grime build up on the main plate in or around the alarm spring barrel. Thanks for your comments.

PS - I thought 6138 cal movements were relatively complex. They do not hold a candle to the 4006. Very complex movement in my opinion with tons of levers and springs to make it all work. I have my work cut out for me.
 

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You can leave the alarm mainspring in as it doesn't need lubrication but I removed it because I wanted to speed up the drying process.

Seiko probably wanted to save their technicians some time.

Don't forget to put back the washer underneath the spring.

I had a couple that I deferred because it needed my full attention and time but I found it wasn't as bad as I thought.

You are more than capable and look forward to seeing the results.
 

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I never take the spring out (i.e. clean it in the plate) but remove the arbor and lube the arbor shoulders only.



In the real world (especially if owned by collectors) the alarm spring doesn't get much use so the lube would just harden up and not be much use.



I find them more easy to do than 6138s :)
 

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PS - I thought 6138 cal movements were relatively complex. They do not hold a candle to the 4006. Very complex movement in my opinion with tons of levers and springs to make it all work. I have my work cut out for me.
__________________

Yes, The 4006 is a Blast to work on. I have only done 2 of them and I left the A Spring in place. Easy does it.....
 

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Discussion Starter #6
PS - I thought 6138 cal movements were relatively complex. They do not hold a candle to the 4006. Very complex movement in my opinion with tons of levers and springs to make it all work. I have my work cut out for me.
__________________

Yes, The 4006 is a Blast to work on. I have only done 2 of them and I left the A Spring in place. Easy does it.....
Good to know. Thank you.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Well, the only thing that was a bit of a disappointment upon disassembly was one of the dial feel was missing. Overall, the dial is very nice and I am going to send it off to Tanner Morehouse of TM Watch Co to have the dial feet fixed. I could probably get by with one dial foot given the alarm bezel sits on top of the dial but I want to do this right. I will get the case work done and the movement serviced but the dial might take 2-3 weeks to get back before the piece is completed. More to follow.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Okay guys. Need some more advice. What sort of amplitude numbers should I be shooting for on the overhaul of a 4006A? I managed to get mine together over the weekend and I am seeing amplitudes in the low to mid 260s on initial run in. I also have the lift angle set at 58.4 degrees per the resources I have looked at. This is a 19,800 BPH movement so a bit old school in terms of accuracy.

I must say the watch was a real challenge. This being my first Bell-Matic service using the Seiko Tech guide and some pics I took of the movement were a huge help. What a marvel of engineering. And yes, that date advance spring was a joy. Set it and hope it does not go flying off into space as you carefully set the top plate in position and screw it into place. The other real joy was getting the setting yoke spring in place.

I have the dial out for repair to replace the missing dial foot I found upon disassembly. Once I have that back in a few weeks I will post some pics over in the Watchmaker section.
 

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Not if it's clean and left in place when doing the overhaul :)
Exactly how does one hold it in place when servicing ?

Sent from my LM-X410.F using Tapatalk
 

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I did not see this thread.

It's really common to find dial feet missing on Bell-Matics. There must be some design fault that cause these to break off.

If you can have them soldered on for a good price that's a bonus.

I use to use dial dots but now I have become very proficient at glueing on dial feet. The man advantage is there is no chance of destroying/damaging the dial. But it does take a bit of skill.

Let me know if you are interested and I will post a how to guide at some point.

They are a great movement, there are a couple flaws, namely the dial feet and day and date driving wheel that's prone to loosing its tiny finger but if you have a spare movement or two you will generally be good for parts.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Any thoughts on respectable amplitudes after service?

IMeasure (Dan)- Would love to know more about how you glue on dial feet. I think I recall reading one of your threads some time back where you described the process. What do you use the make the new dial foot? Mine was missing. The good thing about Bell-Matic (at least the one I have) is there is a fairly thick ring on the underside of the dial the dial feel are attached to.
 

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Any thoughts on respectable amplitudes after service?

IMeasure (Dan)- Would love to know more about how you glue on dial feet. I think I recall reading one of your threads some time back where you described the process. What do you use the make the new dial foot? Mine was missing. The good thing about Bell-Matic (at least the one I have) is there is a fairly thick ring on the underside of the dial the dial feel are attached to.



They have a low amplitude c.f. other Seikos.



I'd just glue the dial one - safer than soldering, cheap and easy :)
 

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Discussion Starter #16
They have a low amplitude c.f. other Seikos.



I'd just glue the dial one - safer than soldering, cheap and easy :)
I sent the dial up to Tanner Morehouse with TM Watch Co in North Dakota USA. He does some fantastic watch restorations and lapped the cases on both my Kakume projects. He also does dial feet repair. I trust he will make it right.
 

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Any thoughts on respectable amplitudes after service?

IMeasure (Dan)- Would love to know more about how you glue on dial feet. I think I recall reading one of your threads some time back where you described the process. What do you use the make the new dial foot? Mine was missing. The good thing about Bell-Matic (at least the one I have) is there is a fairly thick ring on the underside of the dial the dial feel are attached to.
I think I'm going to get plenty of free time in the next couple of months, so I will document one and post it in a new thread.
 

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Any thoughts on respectable amplitudes after service?

IMeasure (Dan)- Would love to know more about how you glue on dial feet. I think I recall reading one of your threads some time back where you described the process. What do you use the make the new dial foot? Mine was missing. The good thing about Bell-Matic (at least the one I have) is there is a fairly thick ring on the underside of the dial the dial feel are attached to.
I replaced loads of dial feet because as you say its a common fault, I used to drill the old (0.7mm) one out and glue another in its place.

The ring under the dial is solid but the dial foot is right on the edge, a real design fault imo.

On some of the later Belles they did away with the fixed ring under the dial and had a plastic ring but the feet where not attached to it, a much better system imo.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
I replaced loads of dial feet because as you say its a common fault, I used to drill the old (0.7mm) one out and glue another in its place.

The ring under the dial is solid but the dial foot is right on the edge, a real design fault imo.

On some of the later Belles they did away with the fixed ring under the dial and had a plastic ring but the feet where not attached to it, a much better system imo.
Thanks for the detail John. Are you using 1.00mm copper wire as the material for the foot? So I gather you would drill the plate and epoxy in the new foot or do you just epoxy the foot directly to the ring?
 
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