The Watch Site banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
First of all sorry if this is the wrong section for this question. I'm trying to find a Seiko automatic movement that I could learn to work on. Basically what I'm asking is if any of you know an easier movement to work on that is not going to be missed if something happens. So any suggestions I've always wanted to get into automatic watch tinkering but was always worried of destroying a "good" watch.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,059 Posts
I cut my teeth on the 7002 movement, but all the 700x series movements are virtually the same and many parts are interchangeable.
Theirs plenty of cheap 7009's out there for donor parts should you require any.
The 7s26 and 36 are worth looking at as well, just upgraded versions of the 700x

The 6309, 6117/6119 series is another good starter, but donor's are getting more expensive and harder to get.
JMO.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the suggestions I just found a Seiko 7009 movement that partially works, that I'm going to see if I can win.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
912 Posts
Hi Spektor! Welcome :)

7002 is fine. I would suggest the 6309... You can pick up some old 'dress' watches dirt cheap especially as 'spares or repairs'. Then if you fix it great, if you trash it no matter.
What ever you get take a look at the tech guides here on this site...also well worth you taking the one for the 6139.

You are embarking on a very rewarding hobby....have fun with it and don't forget to ask if you have any problems, people here always like to help, especially if you throw in a good pic ! Use the search too, loads of info on here.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,578 Posts
You can do it! It's easy after you done a few, the hardest part is finding lost parts when they ping out of the tweezers.

The 6309 is a good candidate, it has day and date mechanism (the 7002 is date only). There's any number of junk 6309 dress watches on ebay, thewatchcollector sells scrap 6309 movements by the dozen.

Have a look here http://www.thewatchsite.com/35-6309-project/

Good luck - let us know how you get on.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,290 Posts
I would recommend a working example, just to make sure everything is correct, this way you can dismantle it, and put it back together before you attempt troubleshooting and repairing movements.

Rob
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
I do agree and if I can find a properly working movement I'll definitely get it. I'm just trying to limit how much I spend on one due to it being a very good possibility I may mess up the first time. At the moment I'm getting a movement for two reasons. The first is to understand parts and part names. Secondly is to get comfortable with disassembling and reassembling a movement. Even if it doesn't work its more of a practice run before I get a fully working one.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Also what are some good tools to have when doing this I have a few good pairs of tweezers for different jobs, a Starrett Jewelers set, and a oiling tool. But surely those aren't the only things needed for such precise and careful work.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
708 Posts
Take a look at this thread. There's some good information about the different tools you might need and where to find them.

http://www.thewatchsite.com/35-6309-project/5943-part-2-restore-mod-6309-project-suggested-tools.html

Given that you've got Starrett tools as a starting point, you obviously know that decent tools are important. This is very true with watchmaking -- even for amateurs like myself -- because of the precision involved.

At the very least, I'd get a loupe (5x and 10x are helpful, but 5x if I had to pick only one). You can find Bausch & Lomb loupes for fairly cheap.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,100 Posts
I have a Agfa? Loupe thats 8x
That's good for inspection. I think a loupe in the 3x to 5x range is better for disassembly/assembly. The 8x won't leave much room to get a tool between the lens and the part you're working on.

Good luck!

Myles
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
I also have a set of pin vices? What are these for I recently inherited a bunch of stuff and these were included. I was on a watch site and saw these tools what is their purpose?
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top