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Discussion Starter #1
Yesterday while outside on a cold day I glanced at my new Monster and noticed a small patch of condensation under the crystal. Went back inside and it disappeared within a few minutes.

After reading some post's on here I've decided go put my watch in the fridge until Friday with the stem fully out. My theory is that this is a new watch so the seals and back should be fine and I'm hoping that the condensation is/was caused at assembly. Also this is the least invasive technique before trying more things.

So it's back to my trusted 007 for the time being. I'll keep you updated.
 

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How does it help by putting the watch in the fridge? Wouldn't more moisture get in?
 

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Sounds like a crazy idea to me. Where did you here about it? Fridges are quite moist and any moisture would probably condense on the metal movement parts causing corrosion.

I'd put it in a bag of rice with the crown out like you do with wet mobile phones - or just take the back off and put it somewhere dry.
 

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What I do when I get condensation in a serviced watch (it can happen no matter how careful you think you have been) is remove the movement and blow the movement and case with a hair drier and reassemble while still warm.

If you do not want to remove the movement, remove the caseback and allow the moisture to evaporate in a warm low humidity atmosphere in a dial down orientation. Personally I would still use a hair drier to warm things up a bit to encourage evaporation and warm components will not attract precipitation of moisture, make sure the caseback is warmed up also.

I have not had any problem with visible dust contaminating the dial or inside of the crystal but this would be easy enough to remove before recasing in the usual way.

On the other hand if it is a new watch and being used within its specifications you should not have condensation problems being assembled in a controlled environment with new seals and gaskets. This raises the question are the gaskets OK or was it a bit damp in the factory on the day your watch was made?

Whatever; the refrigerator is as mentioned not the place to put a watch as it is a high moisture and precipitous environment.
 

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I'm not an expert of course, but: warm air can hold moire moisture, you assemble the watch while warm inside and close the watertight case. The air and components inside cool off, cold air can hold less moisture, where does the moisture go?

What I do when I get condensation in a serviced watch (it can happen no matter how careful you think you have been) is remove the movement and blow the movement and case with a hair drier and reassemble while still warm.

If you do not want to remove the movement, remove the caseback and allow the moisture to evaporate in a warm low humidity atmosphere in a dial down orientation. Personally I would still use a hair drier to warm things up a bit to encourage evaporation and warm components will not attract precipitation of moisture, make sure the caseback is warmed up also.

I have not had any problem with visible dust contaminating the dial or inside of the crystal but this would be easy enough to remove before recasing in the usual way.

On the other hand if it is a new watch and being used within its specifications you should not have condensation problems being assembled in a controlled environment with new seals and gaskets. This raises the question are the gaskets OK or was it a bit damp in the factory on the day your watch was made?

Whatever; the refrigerator is as mentioned not the place to put a watch as it is a high moisture and precipitous environment.
 

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I have never had any condensation problems ever, could it be because my spares/parts are all stored at the same temperature ? some how i dont think that storing a watch in a fridge will be good ?
 

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I'm not an expert of course, but: warm air can hold moire moisture, you assemble the watch while warm inside and close the watertight case. The air and components inside cool off, cold air can hold less moisture, where does the moisture go?
I thought about the science and my brain hurt, I just do what I do and it seems to work.

The heating with a hair drier is to evaporate moisture from the watch components only and to stop moisture in the room from condensing on them. It is not to increase the ambient room temperature. when casing the watch the air that surrounds the watch components is room air at room temperature so its humidity is still important.

The air blown out of the hair drier has the same moisture content as the room, just the molecules have more energy.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Sounds like a crazy idea to me. Where did you here about it?
On here! I'll find the post and put it up, it sounded logical to me when I read it. Can't see it doing any harm in the worse case scenario.
 

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Ive seen the fridge idea posted on the WUS site. It must be a frost free fridge and the idea is it acts as a dehumidifier.
Ive only ever had one watch that has had condensation problems after i put it together, and sods law it was one i built for a friend.
To dry it out i took off the case back and put it dial down on top of my laptop then placed a serviette over it to absorb any moisture and to keep dust out of the movement.
Then checked out the case back gasket and stem gasket, which all seemed fine.

When i give someone their watch back i always set the time and date first, on this occasion id set the date wrong, so my friend unscrewed the crown then gripped the crown with his teeth and pulled it out 1 click to set the date. (He's a fingernail biter)
That's when i sussed why the watch had condensation problems.
 

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The air inside a fridge may be near its dew point (bad) but very low in soecific humidity (actual amount of water in a given volume of air - which is good).

I get the idea of putting in a fridge for a while with the case back off, and then allowing it to warm up in the room a short 2 minutes or so before buttoning it up.

That said its not my choice. Why not put take off the back, put it near a dehumidifier, and put the case back on?
 

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Try the Sauna!

Seriously though. I was on vacation and dipped my Bell~Matic clade wrist into the hot tub by accident. I don't trust my vintage watches in the water except my Divers. I Noticed condensation on the inside of the crystal when I got back inside. I had no tools with me to open the case. (NOW I Travel With a Small Set of Watch Tools) The rest of the trip I placed it in the sauna a half hour several times a day until it dissipated. Seemed to work.

Good Luck!
 

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Tools in your checked luggage I hope. It's a nightmare carrying something like a caseback opener through airport security in your hand luggage. Every time you're scanned you have to explain what it is to dubious security staff.


Seriously though. I was on vacation and dipped my Bell~Matic clade wrist into the hot tub by accident. I don't trust my vintage watches in the water except my Divers. I Noticed condensation on the inside of the crystal when I got back inside. I had no tools with me to open the case. (NOW I Travel With a Small Set of Watch Tools) The rest of the trip I placed it in the sauna a half hour several times a day until it dissipated. Seemed to work.

Good Luck!




Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Silly questions Wilkin, but how long have you had the watch & where did you buy it from?
Not silly at all blacklab. The watch was built in May in Japan, bought from a supplier in Singapore and on my wrist in the UK in August.

If the fridge tip doesn't work I'll have to buy a case holder and back remover from eBay and go to Plan B... back off in a bowl of rice or silica packs.
 

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Shame it wasn't a UK supplier as you could have had them under the Sale of Goods Act. I presume the supplier didn't give any kind of guarantee.

The only other suggestion is try the airing cupboard if you have one - same technique as the fridge, as long as its not ridiculously hot it will (normally) be very dry. Probably best to get a caseback opener, I personally don't use a holder just the palm of my hand - if its really tight hold the watch in a tea towel. Failing that a 17mm nut superglued (dont use anything else!) to the caseback for an hour, grip the watch carefully in a vice with wood blocks, undo with a 17mm socket wrench, drop the caseback in the guvnors nail varnish remover & the nut falls away - never fails.

Best of luck & hope you get it sorted
 

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watch lens fog

i gotta tell that you should NOT ever ever ever have moisture under the lens. the case back gasket needs to be re sealed or replaced with silicone lube . ... awhile back after a swim, i had moisture inside my monster and had to re seal and RESEAT that gasket...it has to go in perfect!!! also, in order to dry it out, i took of the case back and set the watch facedown with a soup bowl over to keep out dust. i .have set the time under water as experiment and the watch is sealed

thanks, jim
 
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