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Discussion Starter #1
Forgive me for repeating an old post from another forum, but I never really got a consensus on this. I am not a hobbyist, but used to be a great Seiko fan. I currently wear a Citizen Eco Drive Skyhawk Blue Angels watch and have for several years (5-6). It just keeps going, I love it. The crystal still looks almost pristine after thousands of daily wears.

About 31 years ago I bought my first Seiko watch. It was a A714-5009 digital watch. It had run great all those years but one of my kids when they were small broke the band and some links have gone missing. This is the bracelet that the late Swedefreak fixed for me a few years ago, but shortly afterwards the buttons stuck. I dont blame that watch, that is just aging, i figure. So that was a good one.

Next, a 7434-7008 moon phase watch. Since my wife bought it for me 26 years ago, this watch has had to be fixed twice (always by Seiko) but it never seems to run more than a year or two and needs to be fixed yet again. It has sat in a drawer for many years, but was a beautiful watch. Is there something about that model that made it weak or trouble-prone? It has sentimental value, but just was never reliable enough to wear regularly. That shook my confidence. I am afraid to put more $$$ into having it fixed at Seiko again since they dont provide a long warranty for repairs. I've asked them if that model is particularly trouble prone, but they don't respond. Maybe that is a response.

Then, about 15 years ago or so, I took a chance and bought a 7T32-7C60 chronograph that again I had to have repaired after a 2-3 years. Not long after, it stopped running also. It may be a dead battery but before that the alarm had stopped working. At that time, I was told that it would cost more to repair than I paid for it. That was a watch repair guy at a department store, admittedly.

My conclusion was that Seiko analogs at least were disposable rip-offs. No offense meant to fans here -- I realize who I am writing to.

After that, while shopping for my Skyhawk, I spoke to a jeweler and told him that I had sworn off Seiko (obviously I used to be a big fan) and he was very surprised: he was wearing one that he had had for over 20 years with no trouble. So, I thought it would be worth seeing if maybe it was worth taking a look at them again.

Any thoughts? Was I just unlucky that I bought rare lemon models??? Letters to Seiko only went unanswered except for a repair estimate.
 

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Well, you had two out of three go bad, and both were early '90 quartz models with complications.

I guess the jeweler is referring to the trusted "workhorses" of Seiko 5 fame, or maybe the bombproof divers?

I personally would rate Seiko watches very reliable, however I had no luck with the early 90's chronographs. It seems most of them died of battery leakage. Incidently, I have a dead 7T32-7C60 at home waiting for a heart transplant. You can get a movement relatively cheap from a donor watch (can even be a Pulsar Y182).
 

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Ultimate Collector
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Stick to mechanicals. Seiko have a huge range from £50 up to £1,000's. So loads of choice.

Or how about vintage? 6105 and 6309 divers are classic and collectable (watch out for too many aftermarket parts) or if you want extra buttons to press why not consider 1970's 6139 Chono's. These are all tried and tested great Seiko watches.

You're in the right place here... hang around and see what people are talking about.
 

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The ones that went bad are of the more more complicated seiko quartzes.

I have a couple of older complicated quartzes that are still running untouched 7t32,7t34, and some even more complicated 8m25,6m25 etc. There are 15 or 20+ year old watches.

I know the 7t32s were prone to having issues and were deemed not service friendly by someone more expert here.

If you get a regular modern 6-9-12 quartz seiko chrono with 1 crown and two pushers. I bet that survives forever.

The citizen is much much newer employing newer tech. In fact i would bet that shoots the bed well before a simple chrono.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Well, knowing that people need parts, if I decide to dispose of them, other than the A714, which I really want to get going again, I will check first and see who needs / wants a part watch.

I just hate to throw something like that away. Goes against my frugal nature.

T
 

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If you want a nice battery driven chrono without the fiddly 90's plastic parts I'd suggest a 80's 7A28 of 7A38 watch :) Metal movement and very robust. Besides the usual problems like battery leakage and old oil of course :)
 

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Anything with a 7T62 movement is a reliable workhorse. I spent countless hours submerging my mid 2000s chrono in swimming pools and throwing it in for kids to retrieve off the bottom of the pool and it's never missed a beat.
 

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I've had nothing but good luck with Seikos.

Citizen Eco-Drove new or used on the other hand . . . .
 

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The one thing I have noticed with many of the Seiko quarts models is a lot of bad coils. With the chronograph models having 4 coils in each watch it seemed after 4 or 5 years one of the coils would go bad and you would lose one of the functions.
As far as the 7T32 or 7T62 being label not worth servicing it might hold true if you have to pay a repair shop full price. There are a lot of parts inside that case. and it takes time to take it apart and put it back together.
From a hobbyist point of view it is well worth fixing and 7T32 or 7T62 if you have spare parts. Most of the parts are not expensive. It just takes time. I have brought many 7T32 watches back to life. Also right now there are many salesmen samples for sale on eBay right now. You can pick up a beat up 7T32 cheap. repair the movement. Spend between $40 to $90 bucks depending on how fancy of a model you want and drop the repaired 7T32 movement right into the case with minimal fuss and have a $350 to $500 dollars watch for around $100 bucks.
I have had nothing but good luck with the few new Seiko's I have purchased. If you want to unload that 7T32 I would give you some money for it. I am always looking for another to repair. If it turns out to be one badly damaged by a battery leak then I part it out. I have a complete inventory of used good 7T32 parts all bagged and tagged all ready to go.

Michael
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Interesting to hear how you folks work on the hobby. But I don't have the skills or interest in acquiring them, I am just a person who liked Seikos. I'm a little concerned about all the talk of leaked batteries. These watches have been sitting in a jewelry box for years, forgotten. We're moving and I came across them and the associated memories. The one I'd most like to resurrect is the 7434 because it was a gift from my wife at a very difficult time in our life. But I didn't know that they had plastic gears or whatever. That happened to a lot of devices in the 70s and 80s even to classic brands like Winchester rifles. Price over quality. I don't want to replace the works for a third time (IIRC the first time was under warranty) if they only last a year or two. Tim
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I've had nothing but good luck with Seikos.

Citizen Eco-Drove new or used on the other hand . . . .
Well, I hear you, but it's five years and works and looks like new, and I bought a different Skyhawk for my son when he got his Air Force wings and he is very happy with his as well. Those old Seikos were in trouble within a year or two, and both overhauled by Seiko, maybe twice, and still had a short life. It is good to hear that there are other vintage ones that I could look for.
 

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The Joker
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I currently wear a Citizen Eco Drive Skyhawk Blue Angels watch and have for several years (5-6). It just keeps going, I love it. The crystal still looks almost pristine after thousands of daily wears.

QUOTE]

You are describing my Citizen Eco-Drive PC with caliber E-760 movement, except it will observe 10 years of uninterrupted service in August.
 

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There are some great Japanese beater watches and you might think of trying them out. Like the Casio AMW series, the G Shocks....
Here in Japan, many seniors still wear their old Seikos. But for all else, the G Shocks are really popular for their toughness and low prices. The kids tend to go for Gs or the large Chinese made stuff fashion watches.
Seikos have a high reputation but service is strictly regulated. As in your history of watch buying, some people just seem to have bad luck. I knew a friend who was like this with anything electronic especially laptops!!! Try finding a Casio Marlin series or AMW series ...
 

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I tend to agree with the OP that Seiko,s especially older models such has the divers from the 60/70s are bad news and I would recommend that guys pass them by without a second glance !!! :)
 

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I tend to agree with the OP that Seiko,s especially older models such has the divers from the 60/70s are bad news and I would recommend that guys pass them by without a second glance !!! :)
I totally agree. Best to keep away from them. :smile:
 
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