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More than likely the battery, batteries, have at some point leaked a bit of electrolyte. Doesn't tale much to leave a microscopic layer of crap, (strictly technical horological terminology there, don't be intimidated). Aforementioned crap will inhibit the flow on mA to the circuit, leaving the movement dead. Another problem that these movements have is a plastic post that supports a metal connector that connects two batteries, creating a 3v output. That post has a tendency to break. Then, there is always the possibility that your batteries are pau, as in make, as in dead. I'd check the batteries first, then the battery contacts. Unfortunately, Citizen no longer offers any support for these older Aqualand models. Also, try a reset. Pull the setting crown all the way out, and press the three buttons simultaneously. Aloha from #50, but #1 in your hearts.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
More than likely the battery, batteries, have at some point leaked a bit of electrolyte. Doesn't tale much to leave a microscopic layer of crap, (strictly technical horological terminology there, don't be intimidated). Aforementioned crap will inhibit the flow on mA to the circuit, leaving the movement dead. Another problem that these movements have is a plastic post that supports a metal connector that connects two batteries, creating a 3v output. That post has a tendency to break. Then, there is always the possibility that your batteries are pau, as in make, as in dead. I'd check the batteries first, then the battery contacts. Unfortunately, Citizen no longer offers any support for these older Aqualand models. Also, try a reset. Pull the setting crown all the way out, and press the three buttons simultaneously. Aloha from #50, but #1 in your hearts.
I just don’t know how to check the voltage. I did clean the battery connectors. If you could post some pics or video showing me, I would appreciate it. Thank you
 

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You need a multimeter, with very fine leads, to check the voltage. I think there are two points on the back of the movement that are clearly labeled, one is +3, the other +1.5. Negative points are also labeled. If you bought the batteries new, shouldn't be a problem. Try the all reset first.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
You need a multimeter, with very fine leads, to check the voltage. I think there are two points on the back of the movement that are clearly labeled, one is +3, the other +1.5. Negative points are also labeled. If you bought the batteries new, shouldn't be a problem. Try the all reset first.
Is the all reset when you pull out the winder then press the three buttons??
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
That’s correct
There are litrally tens of threads on tear down of these movements but they are fragile and prone to not working if left with expiredbatter in
Update: I reached out to Hurley company in Georgia that someone recommended. I’ll be sending my watch for repair. Hope it’s not to expensive.
 

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Before you do anything, show a little initiative, and try to fix it yourself. After all, what the f%%k do you have to lose? Buy one of those cheap, made in someones garage outside of Beijing watch servicing kits, get the back plate off of the movement, look over the circuit underneath with the included eye loupe, and see if there is any residual battery leakage damage to the circuit. As I mentioned, these movements have an inherent problem, shared with another very popular Citizen model, in that a plastic post has a tendency to break, that post supports a spring type battery connector, once that connection is gone, the circuit becomes useless, as it can no longer get the 3v it needs to power that portion of the watch. Just check Ebay for the servicing kit, they're less than 20 bucks, with shipping included.
 
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