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Discussion Starter #1
So I've strayed again and ended up with another European ***** from the 70's;

photo 1.jpg

photo 2.jpg

I'm not sure if this post should go here or the non-Japanese section.

Kind of an interesting watch with a pre quartz electronic movement (has balance wheel) combined with a depth gauge (an oil filled Bourdon tube).

Anyway it needs a little work and I was hoping someone out there is familiar with the watch and could help me with some tech details. DeskDivers has an excellent article but not exactly the info I need.

Specifically I need to remove the movement to clean/replace the crystal so;

1. How is the crown removed? I don't see the usual release button.

2. The Bourdon tube is still functional so do I need to drain it first to remove the collet that connects it to the case? I'm not clear how the neoprene membrane interfaces with the tube and collet. I don't want to remove it and have oil drain everywhere.

3. How is the bezel removed? Also it doesn't quite line up at 12 o'clock.....is there a problem with the ratchet that can be rectified?

Lastly, it is slightly out of beat. How is it adjusted on this movement given the stud carrier is fixed? And what is the Lift Angle so I can properly assess it on the Timegrapher?

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Cheers
 

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I wás going to follow up my earlier post here, but I can't be more comprehensive than 7s26b :) Impressive and I'm going to save the manuals for my use too :)
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Wow! Amazeballs! Thanks so much 7s26b! What a treasure trove of info on the movement. Definitely sorted my question re the crown. And any future problems I may encounter with the movement. Fortunately it seems to working well at the moment. I am slowly inching my way closer to solutions :grin:

The questions remaining are specific to the case;

1. The Bourdon tube is connected to the case with a collet through which water enters....to measure pressure and therefore depth. In the base of the collet is a rubber membrane. I am not clear if the membrane is an integral part of the Bourdon Tube or of the collet...this will determine whether or not I need to drain the oil first (which I'd rather not do if possible).

2. Bezel removal...not clear on correct procedure here. Don't want to bugger it up but need to remove it to access the crystal for cleaning/polishing or replacement.

If anyone else can shed light on these 2 issues I would be eternally grateful ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Yes that was the first article I came across last week. In their watch the Bourdon tube was already empty so they didn't really go into detail about correct disassembly sequence if the tube was full (like mine). And the collet needs to be removed to take out the movement.

I did email them but did not receive a reply.

By bezel removal I mean the rotating countdown bezel. I don't want to pry it up without understanding how it is assembled with the ratcheting mechanism etc. There's no simple notch for a case knife like on a Seiko. I'd hate to mar the case/bezel with an incorrect procedure.
 

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Bourdon Tube Removal

Hi biggbubba this is my first post on this form and I think that I can answer your question regarding Bourdon Tube removal. Unfortunately because this is my first post I am unable to cite the web address or provide any of the pictures that I have however the information did come from electric-watches.co.uk

Wow! Amazeballs! Thanks so much 7s26b! What a treasure trove of info on the movement. Definitely sorted my question re the crown. And any future problems I may encounter with the movement. Fortunately it seems to working well at the moment. I am slowly inching my way closer to solutions :grin:

The questions remaining are specific to the case;

1. The Bourdon tube is connected to the case with a collet through which water enters....to measure pressure and therefore depth. In the base of the collet is a rubber membrane. I am not clear if the membrane is an integral part of the Bourdon Tube or of the collet...this will determine whether or not I need to drain the oil first (which I'd rather not do if possible).



The short answer is that the the rubber membrane is apart of the Bourdon Tube.

Some notes on dismantling this movement:

1. Remove the small pressure gauge sensor “plug” between the top lugs. This is a push fit into the main case. The “plug” has a flat on one side to help with its removal. Never poke any sharp objects down this hollow “plug” otherwise you run the risk of puncturing the rubber seal in the Bourdon tube.
2. Remove the Bourdon tube by undoing the two large, recessed screws in the brass block of the Bourdon tube. Do not undo the third screw that is flush with the top of the brass block as this is for filling the Bourdon tube with oil. Carefully remove the Bourdon tube making sure it is free from the depth gauge actuating arm.
3. Remove the crown and stem as you would for a normal ESA 9150/4 movement.
4. Remove the large circular movement ring by undoing the two movement clamp screws.
5. Remove the movement and dial from the case. It should drop out easily.
6. Remove all four hands.
7. The dial is a press fit into the depth gauge plate; the dial feet locate with nylon bushes in the depth gauge plate — no screws
8. The movement is attached to the depth gauge plate in the same manner. The movement has two posts in the dial feet holes (see photos above) and these posts locate with nylon bushes in the depth gauge plate — no screws
9. The rest of the movement is now dismantled and serviced in the same way as any normal ESA 9150/4 movement.
 
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