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I know some people regulate the 7s26 on their own (as well as other movements).
The process is pretty straight forward, although time consuming in having to check how the regulation went after a few days.

My question is to the people that do this for divers.
How do you replace the back and not worry about the water resistance being off?
is there a sure way to do it and know that the watch is still WR to the manufacturers specs short of pressure testing it?
 

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I've regulated most of my auto watches, including several divers. If it's a new-ish watch, usually there's very little to worry about, as the caseback gasket should be flawless. All you have to do is make sure it's properly lubricated with a very thin coating of silicone grease, confirm that the gasket is properly seated, then tighten the caseback down.

I would recommend cleaning around the caseback with rubbing alcohol before removing it.

Most problems come from dealing with an old gasket, or one that is not seated correctly.
 

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You can get tubes of silicone grease from watchmaker's suppliers (material houses). They also sell foam pads impregnated with silicone grease - you just push the gasket or caseback onto the pad.
I actually got my silicone grease from a hobby store. It's used to lube the ball differentials in electric RC cars, and comes in a plastic syringe or a tub. Much cheaper than watch grease here, and it's the same thing. Make sure you get grease, not silicone oil (used in shocks and the gear diffs in nitro cars).


Make sure that you get clear grease, as it's also available in white.
 

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Dielectric grease from the auto store is also silicone grease.

Just look at the label. You want to avoid anything that has petroleum distillates as these will melt the rubber gasket.
 
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