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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As per the title, anyone got anything they want to sell me?
I only want a 'cheap' simple unit to do a pressure or leak test, nothing complicated, not to extreme pressures etc. I just want to make sure that the watches I'm sending out are up to a decent standard.

Let me know if you have got a or can recommend anything

Kindest regards,
Tom
 

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Hi Tom, right I don't have anything to sell but I made my own pressure tester with the use if a "Nalgene" water bottle a car tyre valve and a foot pump, I go up to 4.5-5 bar which is around the same value in ATM,s.
I got the link from RWI forum and then posted my build on RWG forum ( yeah I've got a few reps ) ill try and find the link and post it up for you ok
Found it http://www.rwg.bz/board/index.php?showtopic=19853&hl=nalgene&fromsearch=1
This link isn't my build, this one has much better photos but is exactly the same as mine as this is the one I copied for my build. Obviously be careful with pressurised vessels ok
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hi Tom, right I don't have anything to sell but I made my own pressure tester with the use if a "Nalgene" water bottle a car tyre valve and a foot pump, I go up to 4.5-5 bar which is around the same value in ATM,s.
I got the link from RWI forum and then posted my build on RWG forum ( yeah I've got a few reps ) ill try and find the link and post it up for you ok
Found it http://www.rwg.bz/board/index.php?showtopic=19853&hl=nalgene&fromsearch=1
This link isn't my build, this one has much better photos but is exactly the same as mine as this is the one I copied for my build. Obviously be careful with pressurised vessels ok
Aha... Superb! Thank you for this idea....that should certainly do for starters :)
T
 

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Your welcome, make sure you get a Nalgene bottle ok, a little more expensive but when you feel it against other bottles you will know why, again though its not designed to take extremes if pressure so it's all at your own risk.
Having said that mine has been working fine the only addition I made to mine was to put some ptfe tape around the threads on the neck of the bottle to aid air tightness.
 

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I like the idea a lot, one question though, and this may sound stupid. During test in the link above, it was said that once bottle pressurised, the bottle was laid on its side, watch immersed in water, and a stream of bubbles was seen entering the watch? Wouldn't this allow water in as well.
Sorry just re read the post. My understanding of how it works, alllow air to pressurise watch, immerse watch in water, allow pressure to escape, air leaves watch in water, causing tell tale bubble stream.
Thank you for the link though, would never of thought of this.


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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
I like the idea a lot, one question though, and this may sound stupid. During test in the link above, it was said that once bottle pressurised, the bottle was laid on its side, watch immersed in water, and a stream of bubbles was seen entering the watch? Wouldn't this allow water in as well.
Sorry just re read the post. My understanding of how it works, alllow air to pressurise watch, immerse watch in water, allow pressure to escape, air leaves watch in water, causing tell tale bubble stream.
Thank you for the link though, would never of thought of this.


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No, I don't think so.
You put the watch in, hanging in the air part, not the water part.
Suck OUT the air with the pump so it is then in vacuum.
Your watch SHOULD be airtight, so the pressure inside the watch is your normal air pressure...outside is a vacuum. The air inside the watch wants to escape into the vacuum, but the seals should be stopping it.
Dunk it in the water, by turning it over, and see if any air is leaking OUT of the watch.....bubbles.

I guess if you left it too long it might backfire!

I haven't read the post properly yet, so do correct me if I have this wrong in my mind.....

edit...just re-read your post...yep you got it.

edit edit...I see now, I'm a little wrong. So you pressure the watch, turn it upside down and into the water, release the pressure in the container and see if any air comes out of the watch?!

Anyway...I think I'll be giving this a go unless something pops up second hand.
 

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The way I read it first time was the stream of bubbles was inside the watch, but the movement is still in the watch, causing damage no matter how quickly you stripped the watch down. A vacuum in the watch would suck water in rapidly. Then I realised the watch is hung up in the pressure "cloud", allowing air to enter the watch under pressure (if it leaks). Watch in water, release container pressure and the watch becomes a submarine emptying it's ballast tanks to dive. Once bubbles are seen, I'd remove the watch from the watch and let it blow out in the air. Eye protectection recommended as well :)


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Ok guys the way I do it is as follows,
I always remove the movement from the case first.
Then I grease the seals etc
Then hang the watch in the half filled bottle keeping the watch case just clear of the water
Pump up the pressure to desired pressure (I go max 5atm)
I keep the pressure up for a good five minutes before I submerge the case
As I tip the bottle on its side I then start to very slowly release the pressure
As the case is in the water I release the rest of the pressure
I then if no bubbles are seen leave the case submerged for a little while just to make sure it doesn't leak.
Once I take it out I have a good look inside the case to see if I have any ingress of water, if not I'm happy to recheck the seals replace the movement and then retest.
Have fun now
 
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