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A bit of digression, but I need some help from you guys!

Tried, but failed to fit a solid tire (24 x 1 3/8) on the 24" plastic rim of my wife's wheelchair. As I had no access to a special tool for this purpose, I used the large-screwdrivers-and-cable-ties technique to no avail.

Will try again with the help of extra pair of hands, but any tips to make the job easier would be highly appreciated...thanks in advance!

Update: Success on the 2nd attempt using the above technique...3rd pair of hands did the trick!
 

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Discussion Starter #42
A bit of digression, but I need some help from you guys!

Tried, but failed to fit a solid tire (24 x 1 3/8) on the 24" plastic rim of my wife's wheelchair. As I had no access to a special tool for this purpose, I used the large-screwdrivers-and-cable-ties technique to no avail.

Will try again with the help of extra pair of hands, but any tips to make the job easier would be highly appreciated...thanks in advance!

Update: Success on the 2nd attempt using the above technique...3rd pair of hands did the trick!

Glad to hear it worked. I was going to suggest a spritz of a soapy water solution (1tsp dish soap:1 pint water) in a spray bottle and a cheap set of tire levers. Spray the bead of the rim lightly all the way around, then work the lever starting at the valve hole to the opposite side of the rim. I grew up with my best friend living in a wheelchair from spine degeneration. He and I got pretty good at replacing tubes and patching holes in his tires from all the shenanigans we'd get into rolling him through the weeds and woods.


These are my new favorite tire levers and I keep at least 1/2 dozen all around my shop, toolbox, and at least one on every bike.


https://www.crankbrothers.com/products/speedier-lever
 

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I got another bike last night - a Giant TCR, full carbon, aero seatpost and Ultegra 10 speed.

I won it for $205 NZ


It needs a couple of cables and at the least a good polish & a couple of bolts etc but ok.


I've just done my Wiggle order for it.

It didn't have wheels either but have also won some DT R1900s with a cassette for about $100. I need to replace these bulbous tyres, bar tape and add some bottle cages.


It would be nice to think I can get $600 for it....
 

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Glad to hear it worked. I was going to suggest a spritz of a soapy water solution (1tsp dish soap:1 pint water) in a spray bottle and a cheap set of tire levers. Spray the bead of the rim lightly all the way around, then work the lever starting at the valve hole to the opposite side of the rim. I grew up with my best friend living in a wheelchair from spine degeneration. He and I got pretty good at replacing tubes and patching holes in his tires from all the shenanigans we'd get into rolling him through the weeds and woods.


These are my new favorite tire levers and I keep at least 1/2 dozen all around my shop, toolbox, and at least one on every bike.


https://www.crankbrothers.com/products/speedier-lever
Thank you for sharing this technique..worth keeping this in mind just in case I get into biking!
 

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Discussion Starter #46
Finally done and passed its(my) build exam with the master mechanic at my not-so-LBS. Shimano Ultegra Di2 11 speed with some svelte Ritchey bits to tie it all together and a Brooks Cambium Carved C13 carbon saddle.
 

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Finally done and passed its(my) build exam with the master mechanic at my not-so-LBS. Shimano Ultegra Di2 11 speed with some svelte Ritchey bits to tie it all together and a Brooks Cambium Carved C13 carbon saddle.





Very cool :)


Ti frames will last a lifetime.....apart from people get bored with them and sell them first!
 

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I sold the Colnago (above) last Sunday.


I made a bit of $ but mainly it's good (but sad) to have a bike I'm not going to use gone.


I'm just about to get the correct length stem for my Wilier and it'll be complete ;-)
 

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Yes, into bikes...but gotta be old and gotta be steel.
Here's my 'racer' , a 1981 Viscount 600ex.(as the name suggests, all Shimano 600 Arabesque components) And I have a few more Viscounts (too many to really fit comfortably in the shed), some ready to ride, some needing some tlc.
The fillet brazed Aerospace was a revolutionary bike in it's mid-70's heyday but never really recovered from the 'death fork' moniker after a recall due to a very small number of fork failures.
If anyone is interested , we have a very small but dedicated forum for the Viscount , here (it's worth a read to hear the story of the mythical gold plated show bike - Mike from American Pickers has a secret love for the Viscount)
IMG_8897 by Sooper 8, on Flickr
 
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I haven't been on the bike in a while, but I have been looking at getting back on, I currently own a Giant defy Ive had it for a couple of years and im very happy with it but in Brisbane it just gets to dam hot for me with temps around 30 and the heat reflection is a killer, I toured Europe, with my ex wife in the late 80's - Amsterdam to Athens by bike, it was a 6 month trip and probably the best bit of travelling I ever done.
The next trip I did was a drive from Cape Town, ( South Africa ) to London, we all thought we were pretty tough until we met a young chap on the ferry heading to Athens, who had just ridden the same trip !!!
Man the 80's it was a different world then.
 

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Since this is a Japanese watch site, will show a photo of my Japanese bike. For a while, in the 80's, there was a trend to build steel frames with "aero" tubing, oval and not round. The trend didn't last long as it was found that the oval steel tubes were not as rigid as aluminum and frames flexed. Components were also "aero" with Shimano AX and Campagnolo C-record. The Japanese, always the innovators, led the way in this trend. Top of the line frames from Lotus, Panasonic, Miyata, Vista, etc all had oval tubing. Not being a professional racer, I like a frame with a little flex in it. I have an Aero Panasonic and Vista with full AX groups. The Vista is my favorite bike among the 6-8 bikes I own.
448939
 

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Since this is a Japanese watch site, will show a photo of my Japanese bike. For a while, in the 80's, there was a trend to build steel frames with "aero" tubing, oval and not round. The trend didn't last long as it was found that the oval steel tubes were not as rigid as aluminum and frames flexed. Components were also "aero" with Shimano AX and Campagnolo C-record. The Japanese, always the innovators, led the way in this trend. Top of the line frames from Lotus, Panasonic, Miyata, Vista, etc all had oval tubing. Not being a professional racer, I like a frame with a little flex in it. I have an Aero Panasonic and Vista with full AX groups. The Vista is my favorite bike among the 6-8 bikes I own. View attachment 448939
Cool bike and good history.
The AX stuff would've looked good on Bianchis. Yours must be a close match too.
I remember when that Shimano aero gear came out when I was a young racer. A guy I knew in our club turned up with a new bike so equiped. I was amazed that the brake cables were under the tape etc.

I'm still finishing off my 80s TEAM Raleighs - one with Shimano Golden Arrow and one with Campag 9 speed (Ergo shifters) that I'll actually use ;-)
 

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Discussion Starter #53
I shall have a new gravel bike before Memorial Day. Been shopping and demoing for weeks now and decided on the new Salsa Warbird. This will be my 2nd Warbird, but my first Carbon bike ever... have always had metal bikes with just carbon accessories. Thus far I have demoed a Lauf True Grit, Warbird GRX, All City Cosmic Stallion, and Kona Libre.
 

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I shall have a new gravel bike before Memorial Day. Been shopping and demoing for weeks now and decided on the new Salsa Warbird. This will be my 2nd Warbird, but my first Carbon bike ever... have always had metal bikes with just carbon accessories. Thus far I have demoed a Lauf True Grit, Warbird GRX, All City Cosmic Stallion, and Kona Libre.
That'll be nice to look forward to.

Those Lauf front forks are cool ;-)
 

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Cool bike and good history.
The AX stuff would've looked good on Bianchis. Yours must be a close match too.
I remember when that Shimano aero gear came out when I was a young racer. A guy I knew in our club turned up with a new bike so equiped. I was amazed that the brake cables were under the tape etc.

I'm still finishing off my 80s TEAM Raleighs - one with Shimano Golden Arrow and one with Campag 9 speed (Ergo shifters) that I'll actually use ;-)
The bars on this bike are aero AX and are not round. And the cables run inside the bars. And if you notice, the cables also run inside the top frame tube. The goal was to cut wind resistance as much as possible. The Italians did not really buy into the whole aero thing like the Japanese did.
 

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Discussion Starter #56
That'll be nice to look forward to.

Those Lauf front forks are cool ;-)
In my opinion; that cool factor ends when the fork is placed into duty. My test ride on it was done in a local and familiar national forest where I know the gravel well. It is an inconsistent surface that will randomly and rapidly change from chunky, fresh laid gravel to hard-packed red clay with washed out ruts crossing at tangents to the road along with small baby-head rocks jutting up randomly and at wonky angles. It's those bigger and off-centered hits where the fork really has a dangerous weakness.

The Leaf springs are phenomenal so long as the surface stays relatively calm/unchanged; it soaks up the road chatter and almost feels disconnected from the surface... when/if there's a large rut or larger fixed rock jutting up from the surface and the fork takes the hit; it can really throw the bike off its line and into an unpredictable/uncontrollable situation. The problem lies in the very leaf springs they utilize... there is absolutely zero dampening effect from those springs; they are all compression with near-instantaneous rebound. If the front wheel takes an off-centered hit; that compresses the leaf springs on one side of the fork more than the other and if the rider is not keen to that input force taking place; be prepared for an abrupt course change...

I'm no stranger to taking risks and am known for pushing equipment to its very limit. I value and appreciate durable equipment that will soldier right alongside me through the worst of conditions and leave me confident that I need not worry about its performance. The Lauf left me uneasy with trusting it on fast and curved descents like we have here on the east coast. Our mountain gravel roads are often laden with washed out descents that have many blind curves and descending radius curves where you may have to react to a line change within milliseconds; lest you take a plunge off a cliff face into a ravine.
 

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Here's my old Merlin -



It's a 1996 frame and the components apart from the tyres, grips and pedals are period correct. Shimano XTR M900 drivetrain and brakes, Syncros cranks and seatpost, Rockshox Judy FSX forks with Englund air cartridges etc. I also have a 10 year old Ibis Mojo for the gnar but it's the Merlin that gets the majority of use.

When I met the Mrs almost 20 years ago I bought her a cheap GT MTB. Over the years it got upgraded with my hand-me-downs until the stage where the only original part was the frame. She'd be complaining about some of the trails I'd take her on so I bought her a late 90's Santa Cruz Heckler frame and swapped the bits over. It's currently kitted out with M952 XTR, Pace Pro Class forks, Hope titanium hubs and BB and RaceFace Turbines. You could argue it's a better spec than my bike which is a bit of a shame as it only gets used a few times a year -



The frame is an odd one in that it's a 16.5" seat tube but the top tube is the same length as the 14" offered at the time. If it was a true 16.5" then I'd fit a shorter stem for when the Mrs wants to use it and I'd keep the longer stem along with a different seat and layback post so I could use too it but the frame is just too short for me, so I'm on the lookout for a late 90's Turner Burner frame in 16" flavour and then we can both use it.
 
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