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Discussion Starter #24
I was born in ‘75 so all my bikes were in the ‘80s... more BMX style than the old banana seat bikes. My buddies in the neighborhood used to come get me to go build random ramps all over the neighborhood, jumping ditches, creek beds, whatever we could find.

I’m still building ramps, berms, and bucking over stuff 40 years later.

Have a buddy in Japan that found a bike he liked near me and asked me to check it out for him. I did, he bought, and I promptly took it for a ride down the Neuse River Trail for its maiden voyage.

2019 Salsa Fargo
 

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I’ve got a few photos of bikes I’ve had or still have. Some are tarted up a bit, and sadly a couple photos of current bikes, both mine and my wife’s all covered in dust in the basement. Such a sorry state




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I rode a lot and raced a little in the 70’s and 80’s. My basement has way too much bike stuff in it, including a full Campagnolo-equipped Nishiki Maxima (Columbus SL tubing, built by Colnago) from the early 1980’s. Also the 531-straight-gauge Falcon that I rode my first solo century on, and the fat-tube aluminum Cannondale on which I did my last. After the steel bikes I grew up riding, that first generation aluminum Cannondale felt like a Cadillac.

There’s also a tourer built on a surprisingly decent Nashbar touring frame, a gravel grinder project on a Fuji cyclocross frame, a Diamondback hybrid, a couple other mountain bikes of dubious parentage, and an e-bike project that I really need to finish. In my home office there’s a road bike on a trainer. And a lot of wheels ... I used to do a fair amount of wheel building.

My riding career has had two major interruptions thus far — getting hit by a car in 1986 and getting hit by a truck in 2010. The second time I was actually on a Harley V-Rod, but it still hurt ;-).

I picked up a used Trek FX a couple months ago and hope to join my wife on some easy bike-path rides this summer. The winter projects include overhauling two of my wife’s bikes and fixing a couple things on my recent acquisition. With the arthritis in my hands I don’t have the patience for wheel building any more, so I’ll probably farm the wheel maintenance out to a local shop.
 

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Discussion Starter #30
Great rides everyone! I have a new-to-me ride on the way. It will be replacing my IndyFab to serve as the daily road duty bike.
 

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The vintage bike hobby is pretty similar to the vintage watch hobby. In the early 70's, the bike I really wanted was the Fuji Professional but it was more than twice as expensive as the Peugeot I actually bought. In the 70's, the Japanese were doing cool stuff. The early Dura Ace was nearly visually identical to Campagnolo Super Record. In the early 80s, Shimano developed the AX aero components which were very cool. Gradually, Shimano perfected index shifting which took over and blew Campagnolo into the weeds. Campy stuck with friction shifting way longer than they should have and almost went out of business. That cheating Lance Armstrong proved to the world that Shimano and the Japanese built un-beatable bike components.
Getting back to vintage, there is a certain snobbery among vintage bike people for European bikes and components. I have a couple Italian bikes with Campagnolo components on them but the bikes I ride most are late 70's and early 80's Japanese. Fuji, Miyata, Panasonic, Nishiki and Lotus certainly make every day beaters but their high end bikes were superior to anything coming out of Europe. At the same time, Seiko was building world beating watches and the Europeans almost went out of business. It's the same story with motorcycles and cars. Certainly, many people still feel European machinery is the best but Japan is certainly as good or better in almost every aspect. I drive a Honda, ride a Kawasaki and wear a Seiko. That says how I feel on the subject.
 

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I have some og rides I still kick around on.
First one is a custom made Icicle from 90' that one of the Iditabike builders in Alaska built for me out of OX3 True Temper. Mavic hubs, Mavix MTB Y shifters, ti bottom bracket, Cooks cranks. I still ride if frequently. I just had it repowder coated. I also picked up some vintage Cook Bros brakes.

Second one is a Ventana. I just rebuilt the SID1 shocks on it. I love this bike. It is great for the local trails.

Klein Rascal 1991 I think. I have had it for a long time. It needs some love. So hopefully this summer I rebuild it or sell it.
 

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Discussion Starter #34
The vintage bike hobby is pretty similar to the vintage watch hobby. In the early 70's, the bike I really wanted was the Fuji Professional but it was more than twice as expensive as the Peugeot I actually bought. In the 70's, the Japanese were doing cool stuff. The early Dura Ace was nearly visually identical to Campagnolo Super Record. In the early 80s, Shimano developed the AX aero components which were very cool. Gradually, Shimano perfected index shifting which took over and blew Campagnolo into the weeds. Campy stuck with friction shifting way longer than they should have and almost went out of business. That cheating Lance Armstrong proved to the world that Shimano and the Japanese built un-beatable bike components.
Getting back to vintage, there is a certain snobbery among vintage bike people for European bikes and components. I have a couple Italian bikes with Campagnolo components on them but the bikes I ride most are late 70's and early 80's Japanese. Fuji, Miyata, Panasonic, Nishiki and Lotus certainly make every day beaters but their high end bikes were superior to anything coming out of Europe. At the same time, Seiko was building world beating watches and the Europeans almost went out of business. It's the same story with motorcycles and cars. Certainly, many people still feel European machinery is the best but Japan is certainly as good or better in almost every aspect. I drive a Honda, ride a Kawasaki and wear a Seiko. That says how I feel on the subject.
I’ve always been on the Japanese groups until this latest bike. I recently purchased a new-to-me road bike that was outfitted with Campy Record 10 speed, triple chainring up front. It was... an adjustment, and I’m not completely sold yet. The levers are much shorter on the Campy and though the thumb shifters are nice, they cannot be reached from the drops without monkey thumbs. I will say, I do like the ergos of the Campy hoods over the Shimano.
 

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Good thread ;-)




I have too many bikes and have had nearly 90 (with photos). Most of fixed or built up and sold for a profit.
Almost all are road.
At the moment;
Argon 18 (fast training bike),
Look (race bike),
Reid (training),
Cannondale Synapse hydrolic disc with mudguards (Winter training),
Bauer Singlespeed (classic, SS training owned for 23 years),
Colnago AC - R (built to sell and for sale),
Trek MTB (never used) &
two TEAM Raleighs from the 80s I've restored.




I train and race a lot - club racing and events (Sportivs). Last year I did over 7000kms up to September when the club race season ended and I only did about 50kms a week from then on.


I'm now upping the ante as the race season starts on Feb 8th. I'm slow - but I want to be....less slow!
 

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That Colnago is very hot. You have a nice set of bikes!


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Discussion Starter #37
Good thread ;-)




I have too many bikes and have had nearly 90 (with photos). Most of fixed or built up and sold for a profit.
Almost all are road.
At the moment;
Argon 18 (fast training bike),
Look (race bike),
Reid (training),
Cannondale Synapse hydrolic disc with mudguards (Winter training),
Bauer Singlespeed (classic, SS training owned for 23 years),
Colnago AC - R (built to sell and for sale),
Trek MTB (never used) &
two TEAM Raleighs from the 80s I've restored.




I train and race a lot - club racing and events (Sportivs). Last year I did over 7000kms up to September when the club race season ended and I only did about 50kms a week from then on.


I'm now upping the ante as the race season starts on Feb 8th. I'm slow - but I want to be....less slow!
Very solid collection and all look like they’ll help with building that speed, especially that Colnago.
 
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