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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I imagine others like me must have a few nice 3 o'clock position day wheels hanging about that they wish were 4 o'clock day wheels for there diver mods etc ?

I had one some time back that was loose on the star and i modded it to be a 4 position after a little messing about and trial and error.

I find that they are in the main pressed into position very well and hard to loosen off without causing damage.

Typical when you dont want them to move though they do, like on one or two 6139s that i have had them come loose on in the past.

So anyone got a quick and easy foolproof method ?
 

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I tried the same once tiger, and I could never get the 3 to line up with the 4 no matter what I did. This was with a 7S26 day wheel mind you. I suppose if I kept fooling around I could made it happen, but it was a PITA so I put it aside.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
That's a teaser John.......I will have to investigate that one :)

I have even thought about making a jig for alignment purposes which would be fairly straight forward but it is freeing the dial from the star which is difficult without causing damage.

Something i did notice on my spare dials of both types was:

4 o'clock position: Check centrally between Sun and the next day and you will see a mark on the edge of the wheel.

3 o'clock position: The mark I mention above is between Thu and the next day.

I think (again i could be wrong) that this mark was used for aligning with the star/gear for the correct position ?

ps: The above might mean nothing and just be coincidence on the ones i have checked.
 

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Tiger I have another though process that is influenced by my 40 years of building scale model airplanes. Without me taking out my stash bin with date wheels do you know if the date wheels are physically the same. Meaning is it just the matter of how the numerals are printed on a dial and not a completely different dial? If so then it should be possible to scan a dial for the correct movement meant for a 4 O'clock window. Then use a photo editing program to drop everything of the picture but the numerals. Hobby stores sell decal paper for model builders that have a clear carrier film. Once you have your saved file all you need to do is purchase blank decal paper being sure you buy the kind that is clear or you can also purchase white if you desire a white background. If you don't have a photo printer put your file on a memory stick and bring it to a shop that does. One other thing that is important is once the image is printed the paper needs to be sprayed with a sealant that will seal the ink in between the decal film and the sealant. The sealant should be available where ever they sell the decal paper. The deals are very easy to manipulate and get lined up on the date dial while they are damp. It all sounds way more complicated than it really is. If you have anyone you know who does scale modeling ask them about printing custom decals. Once you get it all sorted out you can print anything you need including bezel inserts for those inserts that are not available separately from the bezel or the ones where the bezel insets are just not available

Michael.
 

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Micheal, I know exactly what you mean, I'm in the process of doing exactly the same for an old WW2 Glycine, I'm having to print a whole dial, I'm using photo shop 6 (hooky copy ahem)
I found a picture of the dial and copied it, then photo shopped the hands off, next I resized for 29mm and ran a sheet off, something went a little wrong as they came out abit too big by a couple of mm but looked great, any way I now need to re work the sizing and do another print run.
To explain the process to other forum members the best way is to remember putting transfers on all those model aeroplane kits, well that's basically all you are doing, apart from actually printing the transfer image itself. For the sealer I use Matt varnish in spray form made by humbrol model paints it works a treat.
 

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Micheal, I know exactly what you mean, I'm in the process of doing exactly the same for an old WW2 Glycine, I'm having to print a whole dial, I'm using photo shop 6 (hooky copy ahem)
I found a picture of the dial and copied it, then photo shopped the hands off, next I resized for 29mm and ran a sheet off, something went a little wrong as they came out abit too big by a couple of mm but looked great, any way I now need to re work the sizing and do another print run.
To explain the process to other forum members the best way is to remember putting transfers on all those model aeroplane kits, well that's basically all you are doing, apart from actually printing the transfer image itself. For the sealer I use Matt varnish in spray form made by humbrol model paints it works a treat.
Glad to see you all don't think I'm crazy with my though process. I am setting up to print out some decals for some bezel inserts for some older model Sports 100 models that have the odd size bezel inserts. To me if you have Photoshop and a scanner it seems to be the best way to restore the bezel inserts or make custom date wheels. It might all sound confusing to those who have never build model airplanes though.

Michael
 
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