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Discussion Starter #1
A mixture of senseless greed and dogged determination have resulted in my acquisition of a second personal Seiko grail in three months: my beloved 6105-8119 will now be sharing my left wrist with an intact silver 7A28-7000. (I'll be sure to post pics for your approval when it arrives.)

Meantime, though, I'm trying to suss out what my approach should be in dealing with the cracks in its black plastic pushers. The worst one looks like this:



Both pushers are apparently still snug and solid-feeling, so they're not dead yet...

I've got access to some decent 3D printing facilities and expect that I'll eventually try my hand at printing some pressure-fit replicas. (If I was the enterprising sort and there was an actual market for this kind of thing, I'd get a bunch made from anodized aluminum and retire!) But for the sake of maxing out the lifespan of the originals, my current plan is to try to fill the cracks in with JB Weld, likely applied with a very fine needle. That stuff can be messy but it seems to work well with brittle plastic as it's very hard and doesn't shrink when it dries--unlike Testors or Krazy Glue or whatever, which would probably do more harm than good.

That said, I figured I'd put a message out to the community to see if there have been any recent successes in treating these pathetic old plastic caps?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Is this the 7a28 that was sold a few days ago on ebay? Was a lovely piece.
Indeed! I was shocked by how few bidders showed up for that auction. The first silver 'Ripley' I've seen sell for an almost-reasonable price in a long while... Very excited to get my hands on it. :grin:
 

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Indeed! I was shocked by how few bidders showed up for that auction. The first silver 'Ripley' I've seen sell for an almost-reasonable price in a long while... Very excited to get my hands on it. :grin:
Couldnt bid on it because of the "Global shipping program". It was a bargain, congrats!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Couldnt bid on it because of the "Global shipping program". It was a bargain, congrats!
Thanks! And don't get me started on eBay Global Shipping... bane of my existence! I just happened to be on the right side of the fence this time.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I'll be picking this lovely watch up within the next day or two, so I'm giving this thread a cursory workday bump before I let it rest for good.

Feeling like the JB Weld-as-filler, with some diligent masking to minimize the mess and a bit of black overcoat (nail polish or model paint) will be the way to go. Not expecting seamless results, obviously--just a little preventative surgery!
 

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Sounds like the best idea so far... Do you think you'll have to mask the "result" ? Does JB Weld leave any traces or melt plastic ?

You could try just gluing in the cracks, cleaning off the excess if there's any, letting it dry and then, if necessary just fill in the remaining crack, if there will be one, with something black...

You could also try black acrylic paint as it's sort of plastic and they're made to withstand water, the elements, touching, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks for the input, guys!

Sounds like the best idea so far... Do you think you'll have to mask the "result" ? Does JB Weld leave any traces or melt plastic ?

You could try just gluing in the cracks, cleaning off the excess if there's any, letting it dry and then, if necessary just fill in the remaining crack, if there will be one, with something black...

You could also try black acrylic paint as it's sort of plastic and they're made to withstand water, the elements, touching, etc.
The JB stuff I have is kind of a charcoal grey colour, so even if I'm super clean with the application it'll leave a visible line of grey where the crack is. I was either going to cover it up with a bit of acrylic model paint or maybe even a bit of black nail polish I have lying around from touching up the bakelite handle on an old espresso machine portafilter... We'll see. If the result after gluing is relatively level I may just leave it and avoid adding any thickness to the scar.


Locatite do black adhesive - I'm sure I have some - I'll check
Loctite 480
This looks like good stuff! The fact that it has rubber in it could make it a solid candidate for this kind of thing, potentially helping to absorb future bumps and keeping the crack from expanding. And no extra black paint required! :cool:

The main downside: not easily acquired in Canada. But also, it's an adhesive and might actually shrink a bit when it cures, which would be bad news for brittle plastic. (The JB Weld can safely be used as filler as it doesn't shrink at all.)

Anyway, I'll do a trial run on some junk I have lying around and post some pics when I finally get the watch on Thursday. Fingers crossed.
 

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well before i would try jb weld...why not try some bumper repair?....that is flexible and sandable too.....any good professional body shop supply place will have it too...God Bless.John...love the avatar too...John Candy is one of my favorites too...great choice....
 

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Discussion Starter #11
well before i would try jb weld...why not try some bumper repair?....that is flexible and sandable too.....any good professional body shop supply place will have it too...God Bless.John...love the avatar too...John Candy is one of my favorites too...great choice....
Hey thanks, Ringo--I'll investigate. I'm not sure what kind of viscosity that stuff has--whether it's thin enough to be able to seep into such a tiny crack. (These pushers would probably rank among the world's tiniest "bumpers"...) But it's definitely worth a look.

And yes, praise be to Mr. Candy. They don't make 'em like that anymore.
 

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I think one great idea that you've mentioned is 3D printing.

It would be nice to have someone that has one of those 3D laser scanners and just scan an undamaged part and then take it from there. Might not get it right the first time but eventually you'll get it going.

Using quality materials and a very good printer would be very important, though...
 

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well i know of someone with a 3d printer who already makes watch parts....
 

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Well i do not know if he has ever made these parts...he already makes seiko parts....one off parts are very pricey but can be dome

Sent from my LGL41C using Tapatalk
 

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Hey anything can be made with enough money....man.made it....man can fix it....my old boss told me that

Sent from my LGL41C using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I've got access to some good printers and enough technical support to get some fairly accurate (or at least adequate) replicas made. It'll just be a while before I can get around to it. I suspect the surface finish will be hard to get exactly right, but making slightly tapered press-fit blocks with soft edges should be very doable.
 

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well if u have the means...it might be a good side job to sell spares too...
 

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It might be tricky to get the metal parts of the pushers right, but maybe you can use other 7A pushers as base material.

I would sand the printed parts down until they are smooth. Maybe even coat them.

@bry1975 does very nice printed Tuna shrouds. Maybe he can add a bit of knowledge.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
It might be tricky to get the metal parts of the pushers right, but maybe you can use other 7A pushers as base material.

I would sand the printed parts down until they are smooth. Maybe even coat them.

@bry1975 does very nice printed Tuna shrouds. Maybe he can add a bit of knowledge.
My (very loose) plan was to keep it simple and only replace the plastic caps by press-fitting them to the existing metal posts--though I understand fatigued/bent posts are another part of the problem with this model...

That said, I do have access to metal casting facilities as well, but that's a whole other ball o' wax. ;)
 
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