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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
So it has been a while since I posted a restoration project. It has not been for lack of effort. I have a few good ones for you here. A SCWF member contacted me about doing a project for him involving 3 gold Pogues. This member values originality but also wants good functionality and aesthetics. I was specifically asked not to polish or refinish the cases but the 3 projects involved a few case and bezel swaps, hand swaps, and inner rotating ring swaps. Sound easy enough on paper but in reality offered up a few challenges as you will soon see. I want to thank several folks for their support on these projects. Tom (Seikopshyco2) without which none of this would be possible. Just an awesome guy. Also special thanks to Brian (Byscott) and Stefan (Seikochrono) in the UK.

So as not the keep you all in suspense, I will offer up a glamor shot of the 3 completed watches post restoration. From left to right - The Good (72 6139-6002 70m Resist), The Bad (71 6139-6005 70m Resist), The Ugly (70 6139-6000 70m Notch Case Proof).



First up we have a 72 Seiko 6139-6002 Gold Dial 70m Resist on the left. Overall, the watch was in good condition but we did swap out the case for a better one, serviced the movement, and installed new crystal and seals. Of special note here was excessive wear on the upper chrono bridge outer edges; I will detail my finding down below, as well as an interesting lower arbor port repair to the main plate performed by a previous watchmaker. Never seen anything like this before but I must say outside of jeweling, well done.




Movement Service:





Timing and Regulation:



Final Assembly:



An interesting thing occurred when I closed up the case and tried to wind the watch with a few back and forth motions in the palm of my hand. I could hear a metallic knocking noise coming from inside the case back. What the heck? I then flipped the watch upside down and right side up and clink. I had replaced the upper chrono bridge with a newer one with less wear from a donor watch. I had also attempted to tighten the ball bearing race a bit like I normally do with my staking set. In this instance the bearing race on the winding bridge was not loose. What I found was that I could lift the winding weight edge in an up and down movement and that the two rivets holding the winding weight bridge to the weight itself had come loose allowing the weight to hit the chrono bridge and the case back thus making the clinking noise and resulting in the excessive wear seen above. I decided to attempt a repair using my staking set. A few taps of my jewelers hammer using the appropriate stake and everything was secure and in order. Play in the winding weight bridge is something I have not seen before but something I am going to look for on all my service work going forward.




Completed Restoration:



 

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Discussion Starter #5
How had it got bent in the first place ?
John - I could see this happening as Paul describes if a previous watchmaker pushed down on the winding weight while attached to the movement or tightened down the screw to the weight without having it set correctly on the bridge. I have seen at least one movement where I had to physically straighten the winding weight bridge that was jacked up from someone screwing it down too tight or incorrectly.


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