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With the 3ds Max training i've been doing i had to get PhotoShop for post production work on the renders. So happily i've followed these great instructions and very impressed.
On the downside, i now have a list of photos to retake... ;) maybe this weekend i will take over the kitchen table as my photo studio. Can just imagine the wifes face when all the watches come out. lol ;)
 

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A while ago I spent a few days writing a long and detailed Guide To Photographing Watches. It's since been posted on several watch forums and many members seem to have found it useful so I'll post it here, too, if no-one minds and hope it helps some members here capture the beauty of their beloved timepieces.

It's designed for beginners but others may find the odd useful tip, too. It talks you though equipment, basic technique, lighting, set-up, shooting, post-processing, uploading to the net and finally posting on a forum. I hope it helps a few members get into a fun hobby and for others to stay in it and maybe even improve the photos posted daily on the forum.

A Guide To Photographing Watches

If you need to find it in the future there's a link towards the bottom of the right sidebar menu on my blog.


Thanks for sharing..
 

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This really is a great, practical guide. I especially appreciate the fact that you don't demand high end equipment!

One niggle is the recommendation to set white balance to auto. This probably works well in a light tent and with a Nikon camera but others don't do such a good job. I use Sony NEX cameras and their white balance is terrible. Even in a light tent I'd set white manually as the first step!
 

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Discussion Starter #45
This really is a great, practical guide. I especially appreciate the fact that you don't demand high end equipment!

One niggle is the recommendation to set white balance to auto. This probably works well in a light tent and with a Nikon camera but others don't do such a good job. I use Sony NEX cameras and their white balance is terrible. Even in a light tent I'd set white manually as the first step!
Yes, that's probably good advice. That said, WB is easily corrected in Photoshop or similar afterwards so it's not the end of the word if you get it wrong. Nicer to get it right first time, though.
 

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Really good read, a bit of history on me. I was a professional photographer from about twenty to my very early thirties. We had a photograph a watch assignment when I was in college. This tutorial lays out the simple and effective way to do this. One thing it leaves out is where the hands should be placed. I know this is not a hard fast rule but when I was being taught and this extended to my years as an assistant to multiple commercial photographers was that the minute and hour hands should frame the manufacturer's logo. so 10 and 2 or 2 and 10 usually. We where taught (could have been an urban myth) this was primarily started by swatch to standardize the look and make the logo a focus in the ads. We where also told 90% of the time if the hands where not correct your invoice for would not be paid and you would be ordered to re shoot the job.
Thanks for that tip. I acutally notice that with watchmakers when they post pics. Its always 10 and 2. I will try to use it when I sell my collection.
 

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Amazing watches

Its quite interesting and might be helpful for those who have passion for having beautiful watches...however I'm too fond of collecting elegant images of watches...do post it on several forums...
 
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