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Discussion Starter #1
I'm working on another 7015 (and yet another is coming in the mail) and I am going nuts trying to get everything to line up correctly when I put the plates together. The escape wheel always seems to get out of alignment and cause me no end of problems. Does anyone have any tips on these ones?
 

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I have never had any problems with them, they are like the 700x cal.

The gear train bridge screws should be tightened loosely and then hold the mainplate between your thumb and middle finger and touch the gear train bridge with your index finger lightly. Use a slim needle to poke and manipulate the third, fourth and escape wheels into their jewels, when they locate you will feel the plates come together. Check the gear train moves freely and lightly tighten the gear train bridge screws, checking the gears free movement again before fully tightening.

I usually engage the fourth wheel, third wheel and the escape wheel last, you can see if the third wheel is level in relation to the plates visually.
 

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I see what you mean - for me too it was a long & painful way to get more experiances with this calibre and others of the 701x chronos, but now it works relative fine for me - practice, practice and once more practice is the secret :D and the 701x chronos are a bit more difficult (!) than all other 700x calibres.

At first I hope you have some technical informations about these calibres. If not, have a look at
http://members3.jcom.home.ne.jp/seiichi_mamoru/seiko_cal/7015a.html
and for all other "basics"
http://www.thewatchsite.com/d1/files/Casing Guide/26. 7016A.pdf

The big problem is to fit in all the three wheels (escape wheel, 3rd wheel and center chrono wheel) into the barrel & train wheel bridge.
Best way is to fix the movement in a mov. holder, lay down the barrel & train wheel bridge in the first left hole and turn the bridge at right, just over the other screw holes. Gently press down the bridge with one of your fingers and with a small oiler adjust now 3rd wheel, chrono wheel and escape wheel.
Hope the attached photos are helpful.
Best regards, Peter
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Peter and Polly, thanks for the very detailed instructions and tips. Thanks to you two I was able to get it back into one piece with relative ease (after discovering I had lost a pallet stone and had two cracked jewels on the baseplate? Everything lines up, and it actually runs after a fashion now. The problem it that it runs for only a couple of seconds unless I keep pressure on the teeth on the outside of the barrel. I've already cleaned the barrel and mainspring, do you think it might be worn out or could the problem lie deep in the gear train?

Thanks a bunch for the help.
 

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If the barrel and mainspring are ok, there must be a problem in the following power transmission. Have a look to the attached photo, there is the power transmission visible. Often you can find problems at the center wheel, the pinion or cracked bearings.
No chance - a disassembling is once more needed.
I would make a test with the installed center wheel first, if all is running free, there is a problem in the following power transmission.
Good luck, Peter
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks Peter, that's a huge help. While diassembling and reassembling once again I discovered that the jewel I had replaced had fallen out. I guess pushing them in with a toothpick isn't really the best idea. That's sorted now, and it runs slightly longer than it did previously. I'm thinking I'm going to tear it down again and and do another cleaning, and re-inspect all the bearings, then look closer at the powertrain for signs of binding.

How I ever got the first one of these apart and back into running condition is beyond me... must have been less wrong with that first one.
 

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I know it is a pain and time consuming but the only way forward is disassembly and close inspection of all components, then I would assemble each wheel individually to check for free running and end float etc to find out exactly where if any the binding component lies.

If the mainspring is in good shape and the gear train nice and free running it should fully run down without the pallet fork installed and slightly kick back when unwound, if this does not happen though it is not a big deal as this is only an ideal/perfect situation and the watch should run OK otherwise but it will indicate the state of barrel and mainspring primarily and the gear train.

I have also learnt by experience the pallet fork can affect performance and lightly oiled stones are good but the staffs should be clean and dry. I would recommend cleaning and lubricating the diashocks if not already done.
 

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Oooooh ooooh Polly you say to lightly oil the pallet stones (this I do) but then you say not to oil the staffs? Which ones, I oil everything, every wheel, pallet, diashocks and balance.
Am I doing wrong or does seiko specifically not oil staffs.
Cheers for any info mate.

Onto the other subject of lining up the train, I use the same method, lightly hold the movement and bridge and then with an oiler I will manipulate the train to sit in each jewel. For the eratic running, a full strip and inspect is required I'm afraid, when you check each wheel turn it around in your tweezers so the light hits it at different angles, this was the only way I saw a tiny bit of fluff on my escape wheel once that was causing stoppages of the movement. I had cleaned dried etc etc twice and still that bit of fluff was attached but once seen the movement ran fine and still is today.
Have fun and enjoy
 

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I don't oil the pallet/anchor staffs because in my experience it reduces the amplitude, the pallet is very lightweight and the small forces easily absorbed by the stiction of oil. Check the Seiko service sheets in the resources section and they will indicate which parts require oil, the quantity and grade.
 

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Have attention, a lot of Seiko calibres needs to oil the pallet staff (pivots)!

I have had published a list of lubrication points in our tech section for a while, you can see a copy here ...
 

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Have attention, a lot of Seiko calibres needs to oil the pallet staff (pivots)!

I have had published a list of lubrication points in our tech section for a while, you can see a copy here ...


No watchmaker (even including me) would oil pallet staffs. It soon goes old and causes problems.
 

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I hate to say it but these are TERRIBLE chronos.
If another one comes through my door in the hands of a customer I'm likely to say take it somewhere else:undecided:

A part that often wears and soaks up power is the mainspring arbor holes - with the mainspring barrel in place see how much movement there is in the holes. You might be surprised.
The ideal fix is to have them jeweled or bushed but there is another fix too....
 

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I have also been told from a very reliable source (Peter K) never to oil the pallet pivots, it creates more resistance. I have just rebuilt a 7018 and yes, the train wheel bridge is a ***** to get located, but follow Polly's advice, it will go in eventually, that's also how I do it. I love the watch but will probably never get one of these to rebuild again.
 

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No watchmaker (even including me) would oil pallet staffs. It soon goes old and causes problems.
Thats what I heared/learned too.
But why there are pallet staff lubrication points listed at the Seiko Tech informations for some calibres?
Have a look:
 

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I hate to say it but these are TERRIBLE chronos.
If another one comes through my door in the hands of a customer I'm likely to say take it somewhere else:undecided:

A part that often wears and soaks up power is the mainspring arbor holes - with the mainspring barrel in place see how much movement there is in the holes. You might be surprised.
The ideal fix is to have them jeweled or bushed but there is another fix too....
Totally agree with all that. The 7015 is a rubbish chrono, in its defense it is elegantly simple (cheap) but rather pointless.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
100% I agree that it is a POS movement.... no question there. If I had a 6xxx I would just replace it, but I don't so I'm going on this.

And speaking of which, thanks to all the help it's actually running now. Another strip and clean of the barrel and mainspring seems to have gotten going. Now it just stops after a few minutes rather than a few seconds. Sigh. Near as I can tell the chronograph wheel is at fault, the heart is fine but the gear wobbles all over the place. A slight nudge gets it going again.

Still, from really only being able to do basic movements to taking the waterlogged POS and and installing a new pallet fork, some kind of pressed in jewel, a full strip and lube, balance in and out a billion times I am pretty happy with what I've gotten out of it so far. I am also half crazy from working on it after work for 4 days, so don't expect anything I say to make sense. Except for THANKS SO MUCH!!! I love this forum...:rock:
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Hey I just wanted to pop back in and say thanks again. Somehow with your help I have managed to become somewhat proficient with these movements... I've actually gotten two rusty junkers working and running just fine now!
 

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A part that often wears and soaks up power is the mainspring arbor holes - with the mainspring barrel in place see how much movement there is in the holes. You might be surprised.
The ideal fix is to have them jeweled or bushed but there is another fix too....
This is a weak point with many Seiko calibers. You just have to love that wobble...especially when parts have been discontinued.
 
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