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Discussion Starter #1
Does anyone have knowledge of experience with the case design of these watches? I cant find them in the casing guide since they are too new for that. And i dont have any idea how to change the crystal. I dont really see any way to remove the bezel. Any help would be appreciated.
448955
 

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Water Resist-G on the back means that the glass is glued with the bezel, so an original glass will came with a bezel too :) You could try to separate the two measure the glass and find a suitable one to be glued again with the bezel, at least in theory. And just to remove the glass/bezel you'll need a special die from Seiko find in the S-160 - Die Set for G structure Crystals.
 

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bezel presses on top of crystal is my guess crystal most likely have a wide bevel (similar to a 6309 diver crystal)
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I will just send the watch to my watchmaker to get the crystal changed. I dont see any way for me to remove the bezel and try to do it.

The crystal is really strange and is very dull on the inside. It seems like there is some sort of layer of tarnish on it.
 

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Is it possible the bezel is just a machined feature of the case and does not come off, much like a fashion watch?

That would be odd for a Seiko but not for a watch in general.
 

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@Acidstain if it is not bonded, how is it constructed then? From what i can see glued is probably the most likely.



I really dont like polished mineral glass.
How about thanks for the different suggestion!

Do you know what I mean by refinished?

What does "polished mineral glass" mean?

I have customer's rare mineral glasses refinished by a friend who's a glassblower and he gets them back to perfect or near perfect which would suit your glass well.
 

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I have that model and took the crystal out. The casing guide for G will give the instructions. It's complicated.

Before you take it out, be warned that it takes a plastic gasket that is out of stock everywhere. I found a plastic gasket by trial and error. Not happy with the fit but it is going to have to work. Second problem. If you don't have the Seiko S-220 die set forget about trying. I tried my generic dies and nothing fit. I had to dig out my S-220 set from deep storage. The dies fit perfectly.
 

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The link to the casing guide is in the archive, next to tech pdfs.
 

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That's a beautiful Actus!
If it is the same dial as mine, it is an extraordinary shade of blue.

It is almost criminal how little I paid for mine on YJ a few years ago. The heft and quality of the Silverwave series is really nice.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
How about thanks for the different suggestion!

Do you know what I mean by refinished?

What does "polished mineral glass" mean?

I have customer's rare mineral glasses refinished by a friend who's a glassblower and he gets them back to perfect or near perfect which would suit your glass well.
Its just not my personal preference to have it refinished/polished whatever you'd want to call it.

I have that model and took the crystal out. The casing guide for G will give the instructions. It's complicated.

Before you take it out, be warned that it takes a plastic gasket that is out of stock everywhere. I found a plastic gasket by trial and error. Not happy with the fit but it is going to have to work. Second problem. If you don't have the Seiko S-220 die set forget about trying. I tried my generic dies and nothing fit. I had to dig out my S-220 set from deep storage. The dies fit perfectly.
Thanks. I did check the casing guide. But not well enough. I couldnt find them but now i see the 6306-8000 are listed there. It sounds like its not going to be easy with the plastic gaskets.

I could like with some scratches on the crystal. But the haze/tarnish on the underside of the crystal really has to go which will have to require getting the crystal off anyway.


t is almost criminal how little I paid for mine on YJ a few years ago. The heft and quality of the Silverwave series is really nice.
I found mine at a decent price too. But i didnt yet realise how hard changing the crystal out would be 😅😅
 

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In my experience, to remove the crystal on this type of Seiko case just necessitates removing the movement, support the inverted case on a base die that has sufficient clearance to allow the crystal to leave the case, and with a plastic/nylon die that is just marginally smaller than the inside diameter of the chapter ring, push the crystal out from the inside.
This 7s36-5000 was the most challenging, surprisingly putting the new crystal back in the original plastic gasket was easier than expected....
Before.......
449066

And after........
449067
 

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Set out to collect all the parts before you take anything apart. I did see the plastic gasket on ebay once. It was gone in the time it took me to verify that was the right part. Vultures out there, I tell you.
I badly wanted to change my crystal also but could not find a Seiko crystal, only generic. This is a complicated arrangement that relies on angles and depths to seat correctly. There are two gaskets, one rubber one plastic. The rubber o-ring was in good condition but the plastic is one time use. I ended up buying an I ring assortment and moved up sizes until the bezel seated firmly. Seiko plastic gasket part numbers don't give any size information like rubber gasket part numbers.

See if you can clean the inside haze with a microfiber cloth. Mine was hazed up also. Warm up to polishing the outside. It sits high enough that it could be done.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
The haze on the crystal was really hard to remove. I had to use water to get rid of it, but of course had to be super careful with that because of the chapterring. It took me forever to do it but its done. But i found out the main haze is because of someone who tried to refinish the crystal earlier but didnt do it well. Given how hard it is to replace the crystal it would probably make the most sense to try finishing the job someone started but not properly completed and try to polish the crystal back to its shine.
 

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I was just able to check my stock, and i have the bezel gasket and crystal for this. But it looks like problem is solved. If the crystal isn’t too scratched up, best to keep it as is.


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On the other forum, a member showed great success using a brass lap with diamond paste followed by cerium oxide polish. I tried it and got further with technique.
 

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The haze on the crystal was really hard to remove. I had to use water to get rid of it, but of course had to be super careful with that because of the chapterring. It took me forever to do it but its done. But i found out the main haze is because of someone who tried to refinish the crystal earlier but didnt do it well. Given how hard it is to replace the crystal it would probably make the most sense to try finishing the job someone started but not properly completed and try to polish the crystal back to its shine.

What about this "Its just not my personal preference to have it refinished/polished whatever you'd want to call it. "?
If you're so dead set against doing that - what are you going to do?
 
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