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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Call me a doubting Thomas, but I don't think this is the way it's supposed to be....



Is this something that can be fixed? Maybe with a staking set if I had one of those... or do I need to source a replacement?

Happy Halloween

Sam.

P.S. The watch wasn't working before I stripped it, so I have no way of knowing, but I'm wondering if this could have happened when I removed the chrono minute hand? If so, how best to avoid this happening in the future?
 

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That does happen from time to time- best practices (if not outright replacing it) would include closing the hole in the heart cam/wheel and re-staking the arbor, using a staking set. Make sure your hammer click is not too strong too, causing too much force to be transmitted through the hammer to the heart cams when resetting the chronograph to zero. The tech guide recommends that the resistance necessary to depress the reset button should be the same as that to depress the start/stop button.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks Noah, that makes sense, though it doesn't sound like something I can do.

Anybody with a staking set fancy a small commission? Let me know....
 

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It is right what Noah said - without neccessary tools you hav'nt any chance to repair the wheel.
Have attention if you're mounting the chronograph bridge that both wheels (intermediate minute recording wheel and minute recording wheel) sits correct in place before you tighten the screws ...
Best regards, Peter
 

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As others have said, this is very common. And the main use I get for my staking set. (👌👏 clockbloke!)
If you do any regular repairs then this is a very handy and worthy tool to have.

That said, it is very easy to find a method for doing it without the staking set. I believe I had done it by placing the axle In the crook of my tweezers and using a hand setting tool (with small hole) to firmly set the wheel back onto the assembly. Check with a loupe that the two are completely mated.

I always like to reduce the action if the reset, and especially so when this has happened.
 

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As others have said, this is very common. And the main use I get for my staking set. (👌ðŸ‘� clockbloke!)
If you do any regular repairs then this is a very handy and worthy tool to have.

That said, it is very easy to find a method for doing it without the staking set. I believe I had done it by placing the axle In the crook of my tweezers and using a hand setting tool (with small hole) to firmly set the wheel back onto the assembly. Check with a loupe that the two are completely mated.

I always like to reduce the action if the reset, and especially so when this has happened.

I have had quite a few busted minute recording wheels, also sometimes the end of the axle gets snapped off where it enters the chronograph bridge bush. It is my view an over strong hammer click can be destructive and I always tweak this component as instructed in the Seiko maintenance sheet to give a light click action. The hammer works without the click so I usually back it right off.

I do not have a staking set but have had success refitting the wheel to the axle as described by Tom as the fit is still good enough to resist the reduced hammer weight and stay put. I place the wheel on a wood surface with a small hole under to allow the end of the axle to poke through the wheel and press the axle in place using tweezers or small snipe nose pliers lightly grasping the axle and pushing the shoulder on the axle. Make sure the axle is fully home in the wheel or the assembly will not rotate freely when installed.
 

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My experiance is that in two of three problems like this you need to reduce the hole for the axle for correct seat.
Slipping away the minute heart, reduce the hole with a staking tool and replace it - then it's possible to press in the axle with a tweezers too.
Best regards, Peter
 

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