The Watch Site banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
708 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Much to my chagrin, I found this as I dove into fixing a 6139 movement I have:



I didn't go much further after finding that fragment, but how is the date corrector attached to the main plate? It's not a traditional screw, as you can see above, but seems like a rivet of sorts. Is it pressed in?
 

·
Craftsman
Joined
·
2,114 Posts
The broken part is actually the setting lever, if you undo the two screws holding the setting lever spring and remove it (you can see one of the screws in the picture) the setting lever will lift out. There are no screws holding it in place, the axle it swivels on is actually the stem release button.

Scroll down to page 8

http://www.thewatchsite.com/d1/files/Seiko Technical Manuals/6139A.pdf
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,973 Posts
I think it is a broken corrector, the pip on the broken off part engages with the setting lever.

The corrector looks like it is riveted in place. A replacement mainplate would be the simplest remedy.

I have a few if you need one, and do not mind swapping the diashock over.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
708 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the offer Mike! I actually took everything apart last night and determined that it is indeed the corrector that was broken. I was able to gently pry it and the rivet out of the mainplate, and it looks like that was Seiko's intention. I just used my hand levers and it popped right off. I could definitely see this being a place that needs lubricant, though.

Thankfully, the setting lever is fully intact (and incidentally, the pivot is longer than other 6xxx movements to account for the chronograph plate).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
845 Posts
Part you need is 880611. In order to install correctly, with good control, the plate should be completely stripped. If you were careful with the post, it can be riveted back into the plate. I've used two methods to increase friction: 1. close the hole 2. oval the post just a bit. Closing the hole is probably preferable...but depends on plate geometry of the plate (they are not all exactly the same in this area on the train side). After installing, if there is sufficient length of post, I ususally spread it just a bit, as well. You have to be careful...the materials are fairly soft...so it's easy to be too heavy handed. Image attached is a "before" repair of one that had come loose preventing date advancement. Regards, BG
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
708 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Part you need is 880611. In order to install correctly, with good control, the plate should be completely stripped. If you were careful with the post, it can be riveted back into the plate. I've used two methods to increase friction: 1. close the hole 2. oval the post just a bit. Closing the hole is probably preferable...but depends on plate geometry of the plate (they are not all exactly the same in this area on the train side). After installing, if there is sufficient length of post, I ususally spread it just a bit, as well. You have to be careful...the materials are fairly soft...so it's easy to be too heavy handed. Image attached is a "before" repair of one that had come loose preventing date advancement. Regards, BG
Perfect; this is just what I needed. Thank you.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top