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Discussion Starter #1
I did a quick search before asking, but didn't come up with anything.

I have a, new to me, 6138-8020 Panda. I absolutely love it.

After receiving it I put it on my WatchTimer to check its accuracy. (See numbers below). Prior to putting it on the Timer, I wanted to give it a full wind.

Concern:
When manually winding it- it felt like I came to a 'positive stop' (similar to what you would experience with a true manual wind or pocket watch).

Questions:
1. Is this normal? I figured on an autowind the mainspring would just 'slip' at full wind.

2. If this has some bizarre mainspring that doesn't slip. Will a Winder hurt it, or can these me overwound?


Timegrapher Results in 6 Pos. 54.5 amplitude, Full Wind:

Pos +/- Amp Error
CU: +09 200 0.7

FD: +13 220 0.6
CD: -12 199 0.3
FU: +06 220 0.6
12: -06 196 0.7
06: 000 196 0.2

AVG: +1.67 205 0.4



PS Moderators: I would post a photo, but I don't have enough posts here. I am well established at WUS, TRF, VRF, TZ under the same name. As my collection has become mostly Seiko, thought I would make this a new home. :)

 

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Try attaching photos directly to the forum with "manage attachments" until you reach 5 posts.

There should not be a definite stop where you can wind no further. Perhaps the resistance gets really high at the end of the wind due to a bridle that is not lubricated properly? Seiko 61 bridles are stronger than your average bridle, so maybe you are just used to less resistance? But if a non-slipping mainspring has been installed, then I'd say yes, forcing it to wind beyond the end of the wind with an auto winder (or in actual wearing) could cause damage in the auto system.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks. Looks like you nailed it with the stiffer than usual bridle. I very carefully pushed passed it today. I simply never experienced that with ETA auto's before.

Any thoughts on the Timegrapher results?

I attached an image.

Thanks!
 

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Those results don't look half bad. It might paint a more complete picture (if you are concerned about movement condition) to take another set of readings after the watch has run down 24 hours from full wind, to see how much variation exists in amplitude and rate. A step further would be to visually examine what can be seen of lubrication points of the assembled movement, to gauge age and condition of lubricants. But most people are content to judge on far less :)
 

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Sorry to hear about your problem. The stiffness at full wind is caused by breakdown or displacement of the lubrication on the barrel wall. Do not use your watch until this has been corrected; it will cause wear to the barrel arbor bearings and the automatic work generally. It will also overload the entire mechanism which, if the condition of the barrel lubrication is any guide, will be in poor shape lube and cleanliness wise anyway.
Sometimes a watch has been serviced and this critical aspect overlooked but, since getting to the source of the problem involves a major strip down anyway you may as well have it properly serviced at the same time. It is no point trying to regulate a watch where the escapement, balance pivots etc are not clean and correctly lubricated. Sorry if this is not what you were hoping for.
 
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