Watch Service Tool Guide - Part 1 - Seiko & Citizen Watch Forum Japanese Watch Reviews, Discussion & Trading
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Old 07-09-2016, 02:22 PM   #1 (permalink)
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Default Watch Service Tool Guide - Part 1

Watch Service Tool Guide - Part 1

This is an article I wrote for my blog (when it was up but now gone ) describing the most common tools (certainly the ones's I use anyway) used in the servicing of watches and are in no particular order of preference.

I've also got tutorials stripping down and re-building the MIYOTA 8215 if anyone is interested???

ScrewDrivers
It is vital to buy a quality set of watch makers/jeweller’s screwdrivers. Typical blade sizes are 0.60mm, 0.80mm 1.00mm 1.20mm 1.40mm. These screwdrivers usually come with spare blades that are held in position with a grub screw(s) on the screwdriver body.
Higher end brands are A*F, Bergeon 2868 (5 piece set), Bergeon 5970 (9 piece set).
I find the red 1.2mm screwdriver the most used. So if buying a cheaper screwdriver set, spend some money getting a decent 1.2mm screwdriver.



Case back removing tools.
In order to get at a watch movement, we need to remove the case back. This is achieved with a number of tools, some of which are shown in below. The plastic ball, is commonly known as a ‘sticky’ ball and is used on screw on case backs. The ball is made from a rubber like plastic that is very grippy, so you press the ball against a screw off case back and twist at the same time.
The metal tool on the right is known as a ‘case wrench’ and is used where there are recesses around the case back and the tool is adjusted so that the three ‘bits’ on the tool fit into these recesses so that the case back can be twisted off. This tool is supplied with a variety of bits.
The orange tool is used to prise off press on case backs. Watches with press on case backs, usually have a small recess where you can insert the blade of the tool and then lever the case back off.



Another useful tool to prise off press on case backs, is a watch knife shown below. As with the other tool, the blade is inserted into a recess on press on case backs, and the case back levered off. This tool is also used to prise of rotating watch bezels.



Microscope/Loupes
Some form of magnifier is vital when working on watch mechanisms, dials, hands etc. Some people prefer to use a watch/jewellers Loupe. This eyepiece is held in position of the user’s eye socket by their check muscles. The loupe is moved towards the object to get the correct focus. The most common magnification used is X10.
Another option is to use Surgeon/Dental dual loupes. These are simple glasses frames with two loupes attached and are more comfortable to wear than a Loupe



Personally, I prefer to use a stereo microscope such as that shown below. The key points for selecting a microscope are that you do not need a lot of magnification and you need to check on the focal length.
For magnification, I tend to use eyepieces of magnification X5 and an objective lens with a magnification of X1, giving X5 alltogether. For working with small objects, I swap the X1 objective with a X2 objective, sometimes using X10 eyepieces.

The focal length is the distance between the objective lens and the object being viewed. On inspection type microscopes the focal length is about 30cm, giving plenty of room to work with tools under the microscope.
You can use a normal sample/slide viewing microscope, but the focal length will be a lot shorter and difficult to get tools under the microscope. But these microscopes can be half the price of an inspection style microscope.
With either type of microscope, it is possible to fit a USB camera, useful for taking stills/video of your watch work.



Case/Movement Holder
The two occasions where you will need to hold a watch is when removing the watch back or servicing the watch movement.
A case holder usually has removable plastic pegs to grip the watch case. As this holder is not used all the time, it is probably reasonable to buy a cheap version.



Where it is reasonable to spend money on watch tools, is on a decent watch movement holder.
The two movement holders I use, are the Bergeon 4040 and the Bergeon 4513 shown below.





Tweezers
Tweezers are a vital tool for picking and placing of small watch parts. The tweezers shown below are all fine tipped with the tweezers in the middle designed for picking up small jewels and has serrated ends to aid in the gripping of small jewels.
Care should be taken to ensure that the tips of the tweezers stay true and that they do not get bent or distorted.



Ultrasonic Cleaner
For cleaning watch parts, an ultrasonic bath is used (as shown below) along with some cleaning solution.
Also shown, are some mesh containers that can be used to hold small watch parts during cleaning.



The watch cleaning solution I use, is Elma Suprol Special, shown below.
This cleaning solution, is a waterless rinsing agent, especially for watches.



Balance Wheel Cleaner
For cleaning the balance spring, we use a special cleaning agent, known as ‘One-dip’ . This solvent de-greases and removes dirt and then leaves a protective film on the part to shield the spring from rust.



One-dip is also used to clean the jewel and jewel cap of the balance wheel.

Oils & Oilers



A selection of oils and oilers. The Bergeon KT-22 is a silicon grease commonly used on the sealing gaskets, keyless works and stem.
The Mobius 8141 is used for lubricating the main spring in the barrel assembly.
Mobius 9010 is used on the pallet fork jewels and low load gears eg balance wheel, while the Mobius D5 is used on the high load gears eg the Intermediate wheels.

The oilers are coloured according to how fine a point they have. The black oiler has the finest point, followed by the red, blue green and yellow.

I tend to use the fine black oiler all the time and use the larger oilers for re-luming work.

Watch Adhesive
The most useful glue to buy for general watchwork is G-S Hypo Cement .
This is used to glue lume buckets etc to dials and to glue plexi glass crystals.



However, for better sealing of watch crystals, it is better to use UV setting clear adhesive. A commonly used UV adhesive is Sternkreuz Minecol 224. This is a clear liquid kept in a Black light free container and is only cured by exposing the glue to a UV lamp. Such a lamp is shown in below, which is commonly used for curing nail varnish.





End of Part 1

Last edited by odyseus10; 07-10-2016 at 12:58 PM.
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Old 07-09-2016, 09:08 PM   #2 (permalink)
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Mate you need to reference where you get this info from if it isn't yours.
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Old 07-10-2016, 02:41 AM   #3 (permalink)
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Mate - I took all the photographs and so I don't need to reference anything, but you are welcome to search google???

Just to prove it - here's a photo of my work bench today


Last edited by odyseus10; 07-10-2016 at 07:35 AM. Reason: bench photo uploaded
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Old 07-10-2016, 07:40 AM   #4 (permalink)
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I did say if it isn't yours..
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Old 07-10-2016, 10:39 AM   #5 (permalink)
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Can't see most of the photos..............
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Old 07-10-2016, 11:13 AM   #6 (permalink)
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The photos were there this morning but not now.
Thanks for posting.
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Old 07-10-2016, 12:49 PM   #7 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Timegentlemenplease View Post
The photos were there this morning but not now.
Thanks for posting.

I moved them to a separate library in Photobucket and it appears to scramble the links ??? I'll re-link them
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Old 07-10-2016, 01:00 PM   #8 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 28A View Post
I did say if it isn't yours..
I'll let you off then
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