Strap swapping - spring bar question - Seiko & Citizen Watch Forum – Japanese Watch Reviews, Discussion & Trading
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Old 03-20-2019, 07:27 AM   #1 (permalink)
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Default Strap swapping - spring bar question

I have watched videos on spring bar manipulation.

Putting them in looks really easy.


Extracting them involves "gripping" part of the bar and pushing it in. No real problem, routine.

But it would be "easy" to fit a strap where the strap is the full width of the lug gap. Simply compress the bar, slide between the lugs, and manoeuvre until the bar springs open.

If the strap is inflexible, how on earth do you get it back out. The spring bar is fully contained and inaccessible?



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Old 03-20-2019, 08:02 AM   #2 (permalink)
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In short, don't fit it or only fit to a watch with drilled through lugs.
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Old 03-20-2019, 08:43 AM   #3 (permalink)
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If it's not a very valuable strap you can trim a mm or two with a razor blade (very carefully) to leave room for a spring bar tool. I also have a set of flush faced snips and will (again very carefully) just cut the old spring bar and replace it.
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Old 03-20-2019, 09:43 AM   #4 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bugbear View Post
I have watched videos on spring bar manipulation.

Putting them in looks really easy.


Extracting them involves "gripping" part of the bar and pushing it in. No real problem, routine.

But it would be "easy" to fit a strap where the strap is the full width of the lug gap. Simply compress the bar, slide between the lugs, and manoeuvre until the bar springs open.

If the strap is inflexible, how on earth do you get it back out. The spring bar is fully contained and inaccessible?



BugBear
What exactly are you having to deal with, is it a strap or bracelet and do you have pictures?
If a strap, any spring bar tool or any sharp blade that you can use to wedge in. Put a little bit of pressure sideways with your thumb over the end of strap as you wedge in and compress on the bar. Takes a little bit of practice, but once you get the hang of it its a breeze.
If it’s a bracelet, it depends on what you’re dealing with. Some endlinks are designed for drilled through lugs, as in the srpTurtles, but can’t use those on the 6309 even though they fit as there’s no access to manipulate the spring bar.
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Old 03-20-2019, 11:27 AM   #5 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bugbear View Post
I have watched videos on spring bar manipulation.

Putting them in looks really easy.


Extracting them involves "gripping" part of the bar and pushing it in. No real problem, routine.

But it would be "easy" to fit a strap where the strap is the full width of the lug gap. Simply compress the bar, slide between the lugs, and manoeuvre until the bar springs open.

If the strap is inflexible, how on earth do you get it back out. The spring bar is fully contained and inaccessible?



BugBear

In most cases, if you have a smaller size spring bar tool, you can get it between the strap and lug and the strap should have enough give in it to allow you to pull the spring bar back enough to come out of the hole. This should not damage the strap. Different size spring bar tools for different jobs.
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Old 03-20-2019, 12:13 PM   #6 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Reynaldo View Post
What exactly are you having to deal with, is it a strap or bracelet and do you have pictures?
If a strap, any spring bar tool or any sharp blade that you can use to wedge in. Put a little bit of pressure sideways with your thumb over the end of strap as you wedge in and compress on the bar. Takes a little bit of practice, but once you get the hang of it its a breeze.
If it’s a bracelet, it depends on what you’re dealing with. Some endlinks are designed for drilled through lugs, as in the srpTurtles, but can’t use those on the 6309 even though they fit as there’s no access to manipulate the spring bar.
^^^ Agree^^^
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Old 03-20-2019, 12:48 PM   #7 (permalink)
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Thanks to all for fully addressing my question - it arose (hypothetically) as I was removing an old leather strap. This had plastic reinforcers in the loops, that were pretty much full width. I simply cut them off with a scalpel... Which led me to wonder how I would have managed with a non-cuttable strap, hence my question.

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Old 03-20-2019, 04:03 PM   #8 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bugbear View Post
Thanks to all for fully addressing my question - it arose (hypothetically) as I was removing an old leather strap. This had plastic reinforcers in the loops, that were pretty much full width. I simply cut them off with a scalpel... Which led me to wonder how I would have managed with a non-cuttable strap, hence my question.

BugBear

As mwadner said or if that fails then a screwdriver between the case and the strap will carefully bend the s/bar enough to get it out. Sometimes I've had to break off the end of teh s/bar by putting pressure on the screwdriver and then dig the end of the s/bar out of it's hole.
A piece of paper or similar between the screwdriver and the case will protect the case.
Bracelets normally have little cut outs at the end to get a screwdriver in and unhook the end of the s/bar.


A springbar tool is not needed. Screwdrivers are fine.
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Old 03-20-2019, 05:44 PM   #9 (permalink)
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Springbar tools are for springbars, screwdrivers are for driving screws.

As any quality trades person will tell you
563e347ba074c70d6875ef706bff611a.jpg

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Old 03-20-2019, 11:39 PM   #10 (permalink)
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I have also found that on many straps, the "loop" end that encloses the springbar has a teardrop shaped profile. So if the watch is face down, lift the free end of the strap 60 to 90 degrees, and there will be enough of an additional gap to fit the springbar tip in there.

- Craig
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Old 03-21-2019, 12:33 AM   #11 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Craig9802 View Post
I have also found that on many straps, the "loop" end that encloses the springbar has a teardrop shaped profile. So if the watch is face down, lift the free end of the strap 60 to 90 degrees, and there will be enough of an additional gap to fit the springbar tip in there.

- Craig
...and this homemade tool makes it easier for me!
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