Out of curiosity, what is your process to service watches after you get one? - Seiko & Citizen Watch Forum Japanese Watch Reviews, Discussion & Trading
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 03-08-2019, 03:13 PM   #1 (permalink)
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Posts: 51
Points: 3 (+)
Default Out of curiosity, what is your process to service watches after you get one?

Still building my bench based on yalls advice. Damn screwdrivers were expensive.
Have watches mostly 6139b in various conditions. Watched some videos. But I have not cracked open one yet. I did put on a new bracelet!

Just wondering how do you guys start a service process?

I am reluctant to start because I have no idea what Im doing. I am a process kind of guy.

Any advice or reference materials would be appreciated.

Thanks
Paul





Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Back2beach is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 03-08-2019, 03:23 PM   #2 (permalink)
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Posts: 2,555
Points: 37 (+)
Default

Hi and welcome Paul
(Great name!)




The correct height / size bench is a good start. Don't want to be bending down to do watch work.



Expensive tools or lots of them aren't needed. I'd be looking to China for screwdrivers / movement holders etc.

I only use one oil and one grease for everything.



A good light.



A comfortable chair.



Here's my set up; https://www.trademe.co.nz/Browse/Lis...?id=1698986707
__________________
Paul ;-)

Last edited by nzwatchdoctor; 03-08-2019 at 03:25 PM.
nzwatchdoctor is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-08-2019, 03:43 PM   #3 (permalink)
Moderator
 
TheTigerUK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: I want to be a Pedant :)
Posts: 26,774
Points: 483 (+)
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Back2beach View Post
Still building my bench based on yalls advice. Damn screwdrivers were expensive.
Have watches mostly 6139b in various conditions. Watched some videos. But I have not cracked open one yet. I did put on a new bracelet!

Just wondering how do you guys start a service process?

I am reluctant to start because I have no idea what Im doing. I am a process kind of guy.

Any advice or reference materials would be appreciated.

Thanks
Paul





Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Depends what you want to achieve but I would advise before you dive in you do plenty of research and perhaps pick an easy calibre such as the 6309 to start with as they are pretty simple and plentiful.

Buy kit as and when you feel you need it and I would suggest buy the best you can afford, buy cheap buy twice.

Get familiar with your subject.

Remember also not everything you read on the internet is correct but its a starting point, theres good advice and theres "advice"
__________________

"You haven't failed until you quit trying"

"You don't make mistakes, mistakes make you "
TheTigerUK is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 03-08-2019, 04:05 PM   #4 (permalink)
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Posts: 147
Points: 5 (+)
Default

There is a lot more to working on a watch than servicing a movement. Learning to do each thing builds skills towards servicing a movement. You say you are a process guy so this will make sense.


Start with removing the band or strap so you can clean it. Trust me, there is plenty to go wrong if you rush it or do it wrong. Learn how to do this without leaving a trace and you have learned a valuable skill. Next take off the case back to change the gasket. You will have ample opportunity to learn a good practice. Cleanliness. There are several things you need to do to keep crud out of the movement. You will learn how much crud is trapped in a watch and steps to keep things clean. Next do something a little harder like take off a rotating ring to clean and fit a new o-ring. Doing these things will teach you the importance of good tools and proper tools for the job. Change some hands, fit a new crown gasket, clean a dial. Big stuff leads to confidence when you get to the tiny parts.



90% of what you do on a watch involves tweezers and screw drivers. High quality tweezers are worth their weight in gold. If you can't get good tweezers now, learn to tune up and dress what you have. I started with $5 tweezers and pinged parts all over the place. A few Youtube videos and about 30 minutes of work with Wet-Dry sandpaper put my tweezers into shape. I could do better with Dumonts but mine are working well for now. Learn to sharpen screwdrivers and more importantly fit the tips to screws. Japanese screws tend to have wider slots than Swiss. Huge difference in your work with proper tips.


I sort of followed this route but nobody ever told me to follow this route. After the fact, I realized I had done things this way. I do have a bin full of destroyed movements and parts because I got too far ahead of myself along the way. At the time, you could get a bag full of parts watches from thewatchcollector on ebay for lunch money. Not so much the case these days. Be more careful with what you have there.
bk_lake is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-08-2019, 04:33 PM   #5 (permalink)
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: Australia
Posts: 1,226
Points: 60 (+)
Default

Start small and work your way up. Start with a cheap and working movement like a 6309 and follow the technical manual to disassembled and re assemble it over and over again. I started with a 7S26 and this guide...
http://www.clockmaker.com.au/diy_seiko_7s26/

Did you buy a good pair of tweezers?
IMeasure is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-08-2019, 04:43 PM   #6 (permalink)
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: Australia
Posts: 1,226
Points: 60 (+)
Default

Start small and work your way up. Start with a cheap and working movement like a 6309 and follow the technical manual to disassembled and re assemble it over and over again. I started with a 7S26 and this guide...
http://www.clockmaker.com.au/diy_seiko_7s26/

Did you buy a good pair of tweezers?
IMeasure is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-08-2019, 04:45 PM   #7 (permalink)
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Posts: 2,555
Points: 37 (+)
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by IMeasure View Post
Start small and work your way up. Start with a cheap and working movement like a 6309 and follow the technical manual to disassembled and re assemble it over and over again. I started with a 7S26 and this guide...
http://www.clockmaker.com.au/diy_seiko_7s26/

Did you buy a good pair of tweezers?





Good can mean cheap
It's all in how they're used like all these tools
__________________
Paul ;-)
nzwatchdoctor is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-08-2019, 06:58 PM   #8 (permalink)
Senior Member
 
Vette Enthusiast's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2019
Location: NOVA
Posts: 169
Points: 6 (+)
Default

Just like any work you do on an automobile, having the right tools for the job is essential. Buy the best tools you can afford. As others have stated, I started with bracelets, case refinishing, removing the movement, changing gaskets, hand and crystal swaps, hand re-lume, and regulation. After I was pretty comfortable with these skills I dove into servicing my first movement, a 73 6106C. Pretty straight forward, but I rebuilt that movement 3 times with plenty of feedback on what I was doing wrong from others before getting it to the point where I was happy with the performance. Pulling a movement apart and rebuilding it is one thing, but getting it to run well as a timekeeping instrument requires a whole other set of skills. Your cleaning and oiling technique is critical. Invest in a decent time grapher. Essential for getting the movement dialed in for accurate timekeeping. There are a number of excellent tutorial video series available on YouTube for servicing an automatic watch.
__________________
____________
--John S.--
Vette Enthusiast is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-08-2019, 10:12 PM   #9 (permalink)
Member
 
MDNTRDR's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Posts: 46
Points: 0 (+)
Default

Other noobs appreciate the replies as well. All helpful advice. Good luck on the service.
MDNTRDR is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-09-2019, 06:50 AM   #10 (permalink)
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Posts: 51
Points: 3 (+)
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by IMeasure View Post
Did you buy a good pair of tweezers?

Yep. Only the best. Experts say 90% of your time is using tweezers and screwdrivers. I bought a Dumont one



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Back2beach is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-09-2019, 07:25 AM   #11 (permalink)
Moderator
 
TheTigerUK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: I want to be a Pedant :)
Posts: 26,774
Points: 483 (+)
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Back2beach View Post
Yep. Only the best. Experts say 90% of your time is using tweezers and screwdrivers. I bought a Dumont one



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
After using cheap crap my Dumonts seemed like magic
__________________

"You haven't failed until you quit trying"

"You don't make mistakes, mistakes make you "
TheTigerUK is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
The Following Member Awarded A Point to TheTigerUK For This Useful Post:
Old 03-09-2019, 07:52 AM   #12 (permalink)
Senior Member
 
Vette Enthusiast's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2019
Location: NOVA
Posts: 169
Points: 6 (+)
Default

Besides reading, these two Youtube channels have been extremely helpful to me in learning about watches a how to service them. I have been a collector for years but never had the courage to start taking a working movement apart. This past year, I bought an inexpensive Seiko 6106 off eBay. It ran but once on the time grapher I saw it was running very poorly with amplitudes in the lower 140s. Rather than pay my watchmaker $200 to tear down and service the movement, I said, "hell with it" I am going to service this watch myself and that is how my journey began. Amazingly difficult, but challenging and fun at the same time. I have learned a ton in a short period of time and still learning every day. To have a vintage timepiece on your wrist that runs and keeps time well knowing you worked on it is an amazing feeling. I still have not worked up the courage to service something high end like a Swiss Omega or Rolex yet but the principles are the same. Enjoy the journey.

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC7v...cYq0z8oiYFk0zQ

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCrz...mXP9opijc7_B_A

Seiko Technical Sheets Resource:

https://blog.esslinger.com/category/...CABEgLLGfD_BwE
__________________
____________
--John S.--
Vette Enthusiast is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
The Following Member Awarded A Point to Vette Enthusiast For This Useful Post:
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Seiko & Citizen Watch Forum Japanese Watch Reviews, Discussion & Trading forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Out of curiosity... Pei Der Han THE JAPANESE WATCH DISCUSSION FORUM 16 09-15-2014 08:25 AM
Do you ever get one of your watches...... time_watcher THE JAPANESE WATCH DISCUSSION FORUM 17 01-04-2013 03:31 PM
Seiko 6119-6000 after service and after black paint removed from hands jackrobinson THE JAPANESE WATCH DISCUSSION FORUM 5 10-10-2012 09:09 AM
6139-8020 Curiosity thanapa THE JAPANESE WATCH DISCUSSION FORUM 18 03-13-2012 09:04 PM
idle curiosity -- SEIKO "6030" quartz? JohnWN THE JAPANESE WATCH DISCUSSION FORUM 11 09-02-2011 07:35 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 12:32 PM.



Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.